Women behind bars: Health needs of inmates in a county jail

Alexandra Fickenschkr, Jodi Lapidus, Pat Silk-Waikkr, Thomas Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and correlates of poor self-reported health among incarcerated women in a county jail in Oregon. Methods. The authors collected self-reported data from recently incarcerated women at a county jail, focusing on prevalence of high-risk health behaviors, history of health care use, history of physical and sexual abuse, and health care coverage. The authors assessed factors associated with poor self-reported health using logistic regression techniques. Results. More than half of the participants reported a history of intravenous drug use, 67% reported a history of sexual abuse, 79% reported a history of physical abuse, and 43% stated that they had a history of trading sex for money or drugs. Two factors were associated with poor self-reported health: history of physical assault (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4, 5.2) and use of heroin during the month prior to arrest (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.3, 6.6). Conclusions. The high prevalence of health risk behaviors among the inmates suggests a number of areas for intervention. These findings may also be used to guide topics addressed during intake interviews of new inmates, and to help identify inmates that require additional medical or social services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-196
Number of pages6
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume116
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Sex Offenses
Health
Risk-Taking
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Delivery of Health Care
Heroin
Reproductive Health
Health Behavior
Social Work
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Logistic Models
Interviews
Physical Abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Women behind bars : Health needs of inmates in a county jail. / Fickenschkr, Alexandra; Lapidus, Jodi; Silk-Waikkr, Pat; Becker, Thomas.

In: Public Health Reports, Vol. 116, No. 3, 2002, p. 191-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fickenschkr, A, Lapidus, J, Silk-Waikkr, P & Becker, T 2002, 'Women behind bars: Health needs of inmates in a county jail', Public Health Reports, vol. 116, no. 3, pp. 191-196.
Fickenschkr, Alexandra ; Lapidus, Jodi ; Silk-Waikkr, Pat ; Becker, Thomas. / Women behind bars : Health needs of inmates in a county jail. In: Public Health Reports. 2002 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 191-196.
@article{48f1a13c4d5e488cb7b55c878b1f0524,
title = "Women behind bars: Health needs of inmates in a county jail",
abstract = "Objectives. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and correlates of poor self-reported health among incarcerated women in a county jail in Oregon. Methods. The authors collected self-reported data from recently incarcerated women at a county jail, focusing on prevalence of high-risk health behaviors, history of health care use, history of physical and sexual abuse, and health care coverage. The authors assessed factors associated with poor self-reported health using logistic regression techniques. Results. More than half of the participants reported a history of intravenous drug use, 67{\%} reported a history of sexual abuse, 79{\%} reported a history of physical abuse, and 43{\%} stated that they had a history of trading sex for money or drugs. Two factors were associated with poor self-reported health: history of physical assault (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.4, 5.2) and use of heroin during the month prior to arrest (OR = 2.9; 95{\%} CI 1.3, 6.6). Conclusions. The high prevalence of health risk behaviors among the inmates suggests a number of areas for intervention. These findings may also be used to guide topics addressed during intake interviews of new inmates, and to help identify inmates that require additional medical or social services.",
author = "Alexandra Fickenschkr and Jodi Lapidus and Pat Silk-Waikkr and Thomas Becker",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "116",
pages = "191--196",
journal = "Public Health Reports",
issn = "0033-3549",
publisher = "Association of Schools of Public Health",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Women behind bars

T2 - Health needs of inmates in a county jail

AU - Fickenschkr, Alexandra

AU - Lapidus, Jodi

AU - Silk-Waikkr, Pat

AU - Becker, Thomas

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Objectives. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and correlates of poor self-reported health among incarcerated women in a county jail in Oregon. Methods. The authors collected self-reported data from recently incarcerated women at a county jail, focusing on prevalence of high-risk health behaviors, history of health care use, history of physical and sexual abuse, and health care coverage. The authors assessed factors associated with poor self-reported health using logistic regression techniques. Results. More than half of the participants reported a history of intravenous drug use, 67% reported a history of sexual abuse, 79% reported a history of physical abuse, and 43% stated that they had a history of trading sex for money or drugs. Two factors were associated with poor self-reported health: history of physical assault (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4, 5.2) and use of heroin during the month prior to arrest (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.3, 6.6). Conclusions. The high prevalence of health risk behaviors among the inmates suggests a number of areas for intervention. These findings may also be used to guide topics addressed during intake interviews of new inmates, and to help identify inmates that require additional medical or social services.

AB - Objectives. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and correlates of poor self-reported health among incarcerated women in a county jail in Oregon. Methods. The authors collected self-reported data from recently incarcerated women at a county jail, focusing on prevalence of high-risk health behaviors, history of health care use, history of physical and sexual abuse, and health care coverage. The authors assessed factors associated with poor self-reported health using logistic regression techniques. Results. More than half of the participants reported a history of intravenous drug use, 67% reported a history of sexual abuse, 79% reported a history of physical abuse, and 43% stated that they had a history of trading sex for money or drugs. Two factors were associated with poor self-reported health: history of physical assault (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4, 5.2) and use of heroin during the month prior to arrest (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.3, 6.6). Conclusions. The high prevalence of health risk behaviors among the inmates suggests a number of areas for intervention. These findings may also be used to guide topics addressed during intake interviews of new inmates, and to help identify inmates that require additional medical or social services.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036220765&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036220765&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12034907

AN - SCOPUS:0036220765

VL - 116

SP - 191

EP - 196

JO - Public Health Reports

JF - Public Health Reports

SN - 0033-3549

IS - 3

ER -