Willingness to Be a Brain Donor: A Survey of Research Volunteers From 4 Racial/Ethnic Groups

Linda Boise, Ladson Hinton, Howard J. Rosen, Mary C. Ruhl, Hiroko Dodge, Nora Mattek, Marilyn Albert, Andrea Denny, Joshua D. Grill, Travonia Hughes, Jennifer H. Lingler, Darby Morhardt, Francine Parfitt, Susan Peterson-Hazan, Viorela Pop, Tara Rose, Raj C. Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:: Racial and ethnic groups are under-represented among research subjects who assent to brain donation in Alzheimer disease research studies. There has been little research on this important topic. Although there are some studies that have investigated the barriers to brain donation among African American study volunteers, there is no known research on the factors that influence whether or not Asians or Latinos are willing to donate their brains for research. METHODS:: African American, Caucasian, Asian, and Latino research volunteers were surveyed at 15 Alzheimer Disease Centers to identify predictors of willingness to assent to brain donation. RESULTS:: Positive predictors included older age, Latino ethnicity, understanding of how the brain is used by researchers, and understanding of what participants need to do to ensure that their brain will be donated. Negative predictors included African/African American race, belief that the body should remain whole at burial, and concern that researchers might not be respectful of the body during autopsy. DISCUSSION:: The predictive factors identified in this study may be useful for researchers seeking to increase participation of diverse ethnic groups in brain donation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 24 2016

Fingerprint

Ethnic Groups
Volunteers
Tissue Donors
Brain
Research
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Research Personnel
Research Subjects
Burial
Surveys and Questionnaires
Autopsy
Alzheimer Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Willingness to Be a Brain Donor : A Survey of Research Volunteers From 4 Racial/Ethnic Groups. / Boise, Linda; Hinton, Ladson; Rosen, Howard J.; Ruhl, Mary C.; Dodge, Hiroko; Mattek, Nora; Albert, Marilyn; Denny, Andrea; Grill, Joshua D.; Hughes, Travonia; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Morhardt, Darby; Parfitt, Francine; Peterson-Hazan, Susan; Pop, Viorela; Rose, Tara; Shah, Raj C.

In: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, 24.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boise, L, Hinton, L, Rosen, HJ, Ruhl, MC, Dodge, H, Mattek, N, Albert, M, Denny, A, Grill, JD, Hughes, T, Lingler, JH, Morhardt, D, Parfitt, F, Peterson-Hazan, S, Pop, V, Rose, T & Shah, RC 2016, 'Willingness to Be a Brain Donor: A Survey of Research Volunteers From 4 Racial/Ethnic Groups', Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders. https://doi.org/10.1097/WAD.0000000000000174
Boise, Linda ; Hinton, Ladson ; Rosen, Howard J. ; Ruhl, Mary C. ; Dodge, Hiroko ; Mattek, Nora ; Albert, Marilyn ; Denny, Andrea ; Grill, Joshua D. ; Hughes, Travonia ; Lingler, Jennifer H. ; Morhardt, Darby ; Parfitt, Francine ; Peterson-Hazan, Susan ; Pop, Viorela ; Rose, Tara ; Shah, Raj C. / Willingness to Be a Brain Donor : A Survey of Research Volunteers From 4 Racial/Ethnic Groups. In: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders. 2016.
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AU - Morhardt, Darby

AU - Parfitt, Francine

AU - Peterson-Hazan, Susan

AU - Pop, Viorela

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