What's so special about medications: a pharmacist's observations from the POE study.

J. D. Carpenter, Paul Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Observations from a multi-site observational study of physician order entry (POE) confirm that implementing POE is problematic, and suggest that implementing medication order entry is particularly difficult. A pharmacist participating in the study group sought to answer the question: What makes medications different? Analysis of themes specific to medication POE in this study's large data set was undertaken using a grounded theory approach. Emerging themes in the data are explored and include: (1) order complexity and the consequences of error; (2) impacts on professional roles; (3) prescribing needs in different settings; and (4) technology impact on medication administration. Awareness of potential roadblocks and lessons learned from previous implementation attempts should help organizations considering medication POE to optimize their own strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-99
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium
StatePublished - 2001

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Pharmacists
Physicians
Professional Role
Observational Studies
Technology

Cite this

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