What Works? An Empirical Perspective on How to Retain Youth in Longitudinal Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Substance Risk Reduction Studies

Erika Montanaro, Sarah W. Feldstein Ewing, Angela D. Bryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Low retention rates are a problem for longitudinal studies involving adolescents, and this is particularly true for justice-involved youth. Methods: This study evaluates (1) strategies used to retain high-risk adolescents participating in a longitudinal research project; (2) the extent to which retention efforts were different in a justice-involved versus a non-justice-involved (school-based) sample; and (3) differential characteristics of justice-involved versus school-based adolescents that might explain differences in retention difficulty. Results: Compared with the school-based youth, justice-involved youth required significantly more phone calls to be successfully reached. Additionally, baseline substance use (alcohol and marijuana use frequency) was higher in the justice-involved sample and significantly related to retention difficulty. Conclusions: High retention rates for justice-involved and substance-using youth are possible with focused efforts on frequent communication and effortful contact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-499
Number of pages7
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2015

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • HIV prevention
  • adolescents
  • marijuana
  • retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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