What Makes Group MET Work? A Randomized Controlled Trial of College Student Drinkers in Mandated Alcohol Diversion

Heather LaChance, Sarah Feldstein Ewing, Angela D. Bryan, Kent E. Hutchison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nationally, college drinkers exhibit the highest rates of alcohol consumption and represent the largest percentage of problem drinkers. Group motivational enhancement therapy (GMET) has been found to catalyze problem drinking reductions among college student samples. Although research supporting the use of single-session GMET in college samples (general and mandated) is emergent, no studies have evaluated a comprehensive model of the potential active ingredients of this group intervention. College students (N = 206; 88% White; 63% men; M age = 18.6) mandated to a university alcohol diversion program were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: the standard-of-care 2-session "Focus on Alcohol Concerns" education group (FAC), a single GMET, or a single alcohol information-only control group (AI) to evaluate the role of 5 putative mediators: readiness to change, self-efficacy, perceived risk, norm estimates, and positive drinking expectancies. At 3- and 6-month follow-ups, GMET students demonstrated greater reductions in problem drinking outcomes (drinks per drinking day, hazardous drinking symptoms, and alcohol-related problems). Of the 5 mediators proposed, only self-efficacy emerged as a significant mediator.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)598-612
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drinking
Randomized Controlled Trials
Alcohols
Students
Self Efficacy
Alcohol Drinking
Therapeutics
Standard of Care
Education
Control Groups
Research

Keywords

  • college students
  • drinking
  • Group Motivational Enhancement Therapy
  • mandated
  • self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

What Makes Group MET Work? A Randomized Controlled Trial of College Student Drinkers in Mandated Alcohol Diversion. / LaChance, Heather; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah; Bryan, Angela D.; Hutchison, Kent E.

In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 23, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 598-612.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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