What do the screening trials really tell us and where do we go from here?

Ruth Etzioni, Ian M. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Publication of apparently conflicting results from 2 large trials of prostate cancer screening has intensified the debate about prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and has led to a recommendation against screening from the US Preventive Services Task Force. This article reviews the trials and discusses the limitations of their empirical results in informing public health policy. In particular, the authors explain why harm-benefit trade-offs based on empirical results may not accurately reflect the trade-offs expected under long-term population screening. This information should be useful to clinicians in understanding the implications of these studies regarding the value of PSA screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-228
Number of pages6
JournalUrologic Clinics of North America
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostate-Specific Antigen
Advisory Committees
Public Policy
Health Policy
Early Detection of Cancer
Publications
Prostatic Neoplasms
Public Health
Population

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • Mass screening
  • Prostate cancer
  • Prostate-specific antigen
  • Public health policy
  • Simulation modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

What do the screening trials really tell us and where do we go from here? / Etzioni, Ruth; Thompson, Ian M.

In: Urologic Clinics of North America, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 223-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Etzioni, Ruth ; Thompson, Ian M. / What do the screening trials really tell us and where do we go from here?. In: Urologic Clinics of North America. 2014 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 223-228.
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