Weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth

The role of race or ethnicity and previous preterm birth

Naomi E. Stotland, Aaron Caughey, Maureen Lahiff, Barbara Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study how the relationship between gestational weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth interacts with maternal race or ethnicity and previous preterm birth status. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of singleton births to women of normal or low prepregnancy body mass index. Gestational weight gain was measured as total weight gain divided by weeks of gestation at delivery, and weight gain was categorized as low (less than 0.27 kg/wk,), normal (0.27-0.52 kg/wk), or high (more than 0.52 kg/wk). Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed on the relationship between weight gain categories and spontaneous preterm birth, stratified by maternal race or ethnicity and history of previous preterm birth. RESULTS: Overall, low weight gain was associated with spontaneous preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0-3.1). Although low gain was consistently associated with increased spontaneous preterm birth, some differences were found in subgroup analysis. Among African Americans with a previous preterm birth, both low and high weight gain were associated with increased odds of spontaneous preterm birth (AOR for low weight gain 4.3, 95% CI 1.2-15.5; AOR for high weight gain 6.1, 95% CI 1.8-20.2). For all other groups, high weight gain was not associated with spontaneous preterm birth. Among Asians with a previous preterm birth, low weight gain was not statistically significantly associated with spontaneous preterm birth (AOR 1.9, 95% CI 0.5-7.7). Among Asians there was also a non-statistically significant inverse relationship between high weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth (AOR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-1.1). CONCLUSION: These results confirm an association between low maternal weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth. The effect modification of maternal race or ethnicity and history of previous preterm birth on this association deserves further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1448-1455
Number of pages8
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume108
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Premature Birth
Weight Gain
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Mothers
Birth Weight
African Americans
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth : The role of race or ethnicity and previous preterm birth. / Stotland, Naomi E.; Caughey, Aaron; Lahiff, Maureen; Abrams, Barbara.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 108, No. 6, 12.2006, p. 1448-1455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stotland, Naomi E. ; Caughey, Aaron ; Lahiff, Maureen ; Abrams, Barbara. / Weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth : The role of race or ethnicity and previous preterm birth. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2006 ; Vol. 108, No. 6. pp. 1448-1455.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To study how the relationship between gestational weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth interacts with maternal race or ethnicity and previous preterm birth status. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of singleton births to women of normal or low prepregnancy body mass index. Gestational weight gain was measured as total weight gain divided by weeks of gestation at delivery, and weight gain was categorized as low (less than 0.27 kg/wk,), normal (0.27-0.52 kg/wk), or high (more than 0.52 kg/wk). Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed on the relationship between weight gain categories and spontaneous preterm birth, stratified by maternal race or ethnicity and history of previous preterm birth. RESULTS: Overall, low weight gain was associated with spontaneous preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.5, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 2.0-3.1). Although low gain was consistently associated with increased spontaneous preterm birth, some differences were found in subgroup analysis. Among African Americans with a previous preterm birth, both low and high weight gain were associated with increased odds of spontaneous preterm birth (AOR for low weight gain 4.3, 95{\%} CI 1.2-15.5; AOR for high weight gain 6.1, 95{\%} CI 1.8-20.2). For all other groups, high weight gain was not associated with spontaneous preterm birth. Among Asians with a previous preterm birth, low weight gain was not statistically significantly associated with spontaneous preterm birth (AOR 1.9, 95{\%} CI 0.5-7.7). Among Asians there was also a non-statistically significant inverse relationship between high weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth (AOR 0.5, 95{\%} CI 0.3-1.1). CONCLUSION: These results confirm an association between low maternal weight gain and spontaneous preterm birth. The effect modification of maternal race or ethnicity and history of previous preterm birth on this association deserves further study.",
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