Warm water infusion during sedated colonoscopy does not decrease amount of sedation medication used

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Abstract

Background: Water infusion versus air insufflation during colonoscope insertion has been suggested to reduce patient discomfort and decrease sedation medication requirements. Warm water is thought to further facilitate colonoscopy perhaps by decreasing colon spasm. Objective: To compare the utility of warm (35°-38°C) versus cool (20°-23°C) water infused during colonoscopic insertion by measuring patient sedation medication use and discomfort scores between the warm and cool water groups. Design: Randomized, controlled, double-blinded study. Setting: Outpatient endoscopy unit at an academic medical center. Patients: A total of 175 adults. Intervention: Elective outpatient sedated screening colonoscopies. Main Outcome Measurements: Sedation medication used, pain scores, cecal intubation rate, endoscopy times, satisfaction scores, and patient willingness to repeat procedures. Results: There was no significant difference in sedation medication requirement during colonoscopy with the use of warm or cool water (fentanyl 83.6 ± 29.0 μg vs 87.6 ± 39.6 μg; P =.45; midazolam 3.3 ± 1.2 mg vs 3.3 ± 1.3 mg; P =.91). There was no significant difference in patient pain scores or satisfaction scores. Cecal intubation rates (100%) were similar. There was no significant difference in cecal intubation times (6 minutes 40 seconds ± 4 minutes 9 seconds vs 7 minutes 49 seconds ± 4 minutes 0 seconds; P =.06) between the warm and cool water groups. All patients were willing to repeat the colonoscopy by using the same method in both groups. Limitations: Limited generalizability to patients undergoing screening sedated colonoscopies with good to excellent bowel preparation. Conclusion: Water does not need to be warmed before infusion in patients undergoing sedated colonoscopies. (Clinical Trial registration number NCT01322724.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1182-1187
Number of pages6
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume76
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

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Colonoscopy
Water
Intubation
Endoscopy
Outpatients
Colonoscopes
Pain
Insufflation
Midazolam
Spasm
Fentanyl
Patient Satisfaction
Colon
Air
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Warm water infusion during sedated colonoscopy does not decrease amount of sedation medication used",
abstract = "Background: Water infusion versus air insufflation during colonoscope insertion has been suggested to reduce patient discomfort and decrease sedation medication requirements. Warm water is thought to further facilitate colonoscopy perhaps by decreasing colon spasm. Objective: To compare the utility of warm (35°-38°C) versus cool (20°-23°C) water infused during colonoscopic insertion by measuring patient sedation medication use and discomfort scores between the warm and cool water groups. Design: Randomized, controlled, double-blinded study. Setting: Outpatient endoscopy unit at an academic medical center. Patients: A total of 175 adults. Intervention: Elective outpatient sedated screening colonoscopies. Main Outcome Measurements: Sedation medication used, pain scores, cecal intubation rate, endoscopy times, satisfaction scores, and patient willingness to repeat procedures. Results: There was no significant difference in sedation medication requirement during colonoscopy with the use of warm or cool water (fentanyl 83.6 ± 29.0 μg vs 87.6 ± 39.6 μg; P =.45; midazolam 3.3 ± 1.2 mg vs 3.3 ± 1.3 mg; P =.91). There was no significant difference in patient pain scores or satisfaction scores. Cecal intubation rates (100{\%}) were similar. There was no significant difference in cecal intubation times (6 minutes 40 seconds ± 4 minutes 9 seconds vs 7 minutes 49 seconds ± 4 minutes 0 seconds; P =.06) between the warm and cool water groups. All patients were willing to repeat the colonoscopy by using the same method in both groups. Limitations: Limited generalizability to patients undergoing screening sedated colonoscopies with good to excellent bowel preparation. Conclusion: Water does not need to be warmed before infusion in patients undergoing sedated colonoscopies. (Clinical Trial registration number NCT01322724.).",
author = "Lee, {Brent Y.} and Ronald Katon and Daniel Herzig and Fennerty, {M (Brian)}",
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T1 - Warm water infusion during sedated colonoscopy does not decrease amount of sedation medication used

AU - Lee, Brent Y.

AU - Katon, Ronald

AU - Herzig, Daniel

AU - Fennerty, M (Brian)

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - Background: Water infusion versus air insufflation during colonoscope insertion has been suggested to reduce patient discomfort and decrease sedation medication requirements. Warm water is thought to further facilitate colonoscopy perhaps by decreasing colon spasm. Objective: To compare the utility of warm (35°-38°C) versus cool (20°-23°C) water infused during colonoscopic insertion by measuring patient sedation medication use and discomfort scores between the warm and cool water groups. Design: Randomized, controlled, double-blinded study. Setting: Outpatient endoscopy unit at an academic medical center. Patients: A total of 175 adults. Intervention: Elective outpatient sedated screening colonoscopies. Main Outcome Measurements: Sedation medication used, pain scores, cecal intubation rate, endoscopy times, satisfaction scores, and patient willingness to repeat procedures. Results: There was no significant difference in sedation medication requirement during colonoscopy with the use of warm or cool water (fentanyl 83.6 ± 29.0 μg vs 87.6 ± 39.6 μg; P =.45; midazolam 3.3 ± 1.2 mg vs 3.3 ± 1.3 mg; P =.91). There was no significant difference in patient pain scores or satisfaction scores. Cecal intubation rates (100%) were similar. There was no significant difference in cecal intubation times (6 minutes 40 seconds ± 4 minutes 9 seconds vs 7 minutes 49 seconds ± 4 minutes 0 seconds; P =.06) between the warm and cool water groups. All patients were willing to repeat the colonoscopy by using the same method in both groups. Limitations: Limited generalizability to patients undergoing screening sedated colonoscopies with good to excellent bowel preparation. Conclusion: Water does not need to be warmed before infusion in patients undergoing sedated colonoscopies. (Clinical Trial registration number NCT01322724.).

AB - Background: Water infusion versus air insufflation during colonoscope insertion has been suggested to reduce patient discomfort and decrease sedation medication requirements. Warm water is thought to further facilitate colonoscopy perhaps by decreasing colon spasm. Objective: To compare the utility of warm (35°-38°C) versus cool (20°-23°C) water infused during colonoscopic insertion by measuring patient sedation medication use and discomfort scores between the warm and cool water groups. Design: Randomized, controlled, double-blinded study. Setting: Outpatient endoscopy unit at an academic medical center. Patients: A total of 175 adults. Intervention: Elective outpatient sedated screening colonoscopies. Main Outcome Measurements: Sedation medication used, pain scores, cecal intubation rate, endoscopy times, satisfaction scores, and patient willingness to repeat procedures. Results: There was no significant difference in sedation medication requirement during colonoscopy with the use of warm or cool water (fentanyl 83.6 ± 29.0 μg vs 87.6 ± 39.6 μg; P =.45; midazolam 3.3 ± 1.2 mg vs 3.3 ± 1.3 mg; P =.91). There was no significant difference in patient pain scores or satisfaction scores. Cecal intubation rates (100%) were similar. There was no significant difference in cecal intubation times (6 minutes 40 seconds ± 4 minutes 9 seconds vs 7 minutes 49 seconds ± 4 minutes 0 seconds; P =.06) between the warm and cool water groups. All patients were willing to repeat the colonoscopy by using the same method in both groups. Limitations: Limited generalizability to patients undergoing screening sedated colonoscopies with good to excellent bowel preparation. Conclusion: Water does not need to be warmed before infusion in patients undergoing sedated colonoscopies. (Clinical Trial registration number NCT01322724.).

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JO - Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

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