Voltage clamp of rat and human skeletal muscle: measurements with an improved loose‐patch technique.

W. Almers, W. M. Roberts, R. L. Ruff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intact fibres of human intercostal and rat omohyoid muscles were studied at 23 degree C with a loose‐patch voltage‐clamp technique that employed two concentric micropipettes to electrically isolate small‐diameter (10‐15 microns) patches of sarcolemma. This method allows investigation of membrane excitability under highly physiological conditions. Step depolarizations to 0 mV elicited sodium inward currents that reached peak values of up to 20 mA/cm2 within 250 microseconds, and then declined. In human muscle, the reversal potential (ENa) was approximately 40 mV, and maximal conductances (GNa) ranged from 44 to 360 mS/cm2. In rat muscle, ENa was 42 mV and GNa ranged from 100 to 250 mS/cm2. Sodium channels in rat and human muscle were indistinguishable in most aspects of their kinetic behaviour and voltage dependence. Outward potassium currents were small by comparison (usually less than 2 mA/cm2) and saturated at positive potentials. The maximum potassium conductance (GK) ranged from 0 to 19 mS/cm2 (human) and from 4 to 12 mS/cm2 (rat muscle).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-768
Number of pages18
JournalThe Journal of Physiology
Volume347
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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