Vitamin C prevents the effects of prenatal nicotine on pulmonary function in newborn monkeys

Becky J. Proskocil, Harmanjatinder S. Sekhon, Jennifer A. Clark, Stacie L. Lupo, Yibing Jia, William M. Hull, Jeffrey A. Whitsett, Barry C. Starcher, Eliot R. Spindel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Smoking during pregnancy leads to decreased pulmonary function and increased respiratory illness in offspring. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that many effects of smoking during pregnancy are mediated by nicotine. We now report that vitamin C supplementation can prevent some of the effects of maternal nicotine exposure on pulmonary function of offspring. Timed-pregnant rhesus monkeys were treated with 2 mg/kg/day nicotine bitartrate from Gestation Days 26 to 160. On Gestation Day 160 (term, 165 days) fetuses were delivered by C-section and subjected to pulmonary function testing the following day. Nicotine exposure significantly reduced forced expiratory flows, but supplementation of mothers with 250 mg vitamin C per day prevented the effects of nicotine on expiratory flows. Vitamin C supplementation also prevented the nicotine-induced increases in surfactant apoprotein-B protein. Neither nicotine nor nicotine plus vitamin C significantly affected levels of cortisol or cytokines, which have been shown to affect lung development and surfactant expression. Prenatal nicotine exposure significantly decreased levels of elastin content in the lungs of offspring, and these effects were slightly attenuated by vitamin C. These findings suggest that vitamin C supplementation may potentially be clinically useful to limit the deleterious effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on offspring's lung function.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1032-1039
    Number of pages8
    JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
    Volume171
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 1 2005

    Fingerprint

    Nicotine
    Ascorbic Acid
    Haplorhini
    Lung
    Pregnancy
    Smoking
    Surface-Active Agents
    Maternal Exposure
    Elastin
    Apolipoproteins B
    Macaca mulatta
    Hydrocortisone
    Fetus
    Mothers
    Cytokines

    Keywords

    • Elastin
    • Lung
    • Pregnancy
    • Smoking
    • Surfactant

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

    Cite this

    Vitamin C prevents the effects of prenatal nicotine on pulmonary function in newborn monkeys. / Proskocil, Becky J.; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S.; Clark, Jennifer A.; Lupo, Stacie L.; Jia, Yibing; Hull, William M.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Starcher, Barry C.; Spindel, Eliot R.

    In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 171, No. 9, 01.05.2005, p. 1032-1039.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Proskocil, Becky J. ; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S. ; Clark, Jennifer A. ; Lupo, Stacie L. ; Jia, Yibing ; Hull, William M. ; Whitsett, Jeffrey A. ; Starcher, Barry C. ; Spindel, Eliot R. / Vitamin C prevents the effects of prenatal nicotine on pulmonary function in newborn monkeys. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 171, No. 9. pp. 1032-1039.
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