Vignettes

Diverse library staff offering diverse bioinformatics services

David L. Osterbur, Kristine Alpi, Catharine Canevari, Pamela M. Corley, Medha Devare, Nicola Gaedeke, Donna K. Jacobs, Peter Kirlew, Janet A. Ohles, K. T.L. Vaughan, Lili Wang, Yongchun Wu, Renata C. Geer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The paper gives examples of the bioinformatics services provided in a variety of different libraries by librarians with a broad range of educational background and training. Methods: Two investigators sent an email inquiry to attendees of the "National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Introduction to Molecular Biology Information Resources" or "NCBI Advanced Workshop for Bioinformatics Information Specialists (NAWBIS)" courses. The thirty-five-item questionnaire addressed areas such as educational background, library setting, types and numbers of users served, and bioinformatics training and support services provided. Answers were compiled into program vignettes. Discussion: The bioinformatics support services addressed in the paper are based in libraries with academic and clinical settings. Services have been established through different means: in collaboration with biology faculty as part of formal courses, through teaching workshops in the library, through one-on-one consultations, and by other methods. Librarians with backgrounds from art history to doctoral degrees in genetics have worked to establish these programs. Conclusion: Successful bioinformatics support programs can be established in libraries in a variety of different settings and by staff with a variety of different backgrounds and approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the Medical Library Association
Volume94
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 14 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Computational Biology
Libraries
staff
Librarians
Information Centers
Biotechnology
biotechnology
biology
librarian
Education
Training Support
art history
Information Services
Art
Molecular Biology
Teaching
Referral and Consultation
History
Research Personnel
questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Osterbur, D. L., Alpi, K., Canevari, C., Corley, P. M., Devare, M., Gaedeke, N., ... Geer, R. C. (2006). Vignettes: Diverse library staff offering diverse bioinformatics services. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 94(3).

Vignettes : Diverse library staff offering diverse bioinformatics services. / Osterbur, David L.; Alpi, Kristine; Canevari, Catharine; Corley, Pamela M.; Devare, Medha; Gaedeke, Nicola; Jacobs, Donna K.; Kirlew, Peter; Ohles, Janet A.; Vaughan, K. T.L.; Wang, Lili; Wu, Yongchun; Geer, Renata C.

In: Journal of the Medical Library Association, Vol. 94, No. 3, 14.08.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Osterbur, DL, Alpi, K, Canevari, C, Corley, PM, Devare, M, Gaedeke, N, Jacobs, DK, Kirlew, P, Ohles, JA, Vaughan, KTL, Wang, L, Wu, Y & Geer, RC 2006, 'Vignettes: Diverse library staff offering diverse bioinformatics services', Journal of the Medical Library Association, vol. 94, no. 3.
Osterbur DL, Alpi K, Canevari C, Corley PM, Devare M, Gaedeke N et al. Vignettes: Diverse library staff offering diverse bioinformatics services. Journal of the Medical Library Association. 2006 Aug 14;94(3).
Osterbur, David L. ; Alpi, Kristine ; Canevari, Catharine ; Corley, Pamela M. ; Devare, Medha ; Gaedeke, Nicola ; Jacobs, Donna K. ; Kirlew, Peter ; Ohles, Janet A. ; Vaughan, K. T.L. ; Wang, Lili ; Wu, Yongchun ; Geer, Renata C. / Vignettes : Diverse library staff offering diverse bioinformatics services. In: Journal of the Medical Library Association. 2006 ; Vol. 94, No. 3.
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