VESTIBULAR FUNCTION AND MOTOR PROFICIENCY OF CHILDREN WITH IMPAIRED HEARING, OR WITH LEARNING DISABILITY AND MOTOR IMPAIRMENTS

Fay B. Horak, Anne Shumway‐Cook, Terry K. Crowe, F. Owen Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Scopus citations

Abstract

Vestibular status and motor proficiency of 30 hearing‐impaired and 15 motor‐impaired learning‐disabled children were documented to determine whether vestibular loss can account for deficits in motor co‐ordination. Vestibular loss was differentiated from sensory organization deficits by means of VOR and postural orientation test results, which were compared with those of 54 normal seven‐to 12‐year‐olds. Reduced or absent vestibular function in 20 hearing‐impaired children did not affect development of motor proficiency, except in specific balance activities. However, sensory organization deficits in the learning‐disabled group and in three of the hearing‐impaired children were associated with widespread deficits in motor proficiency. Fonction vestibulaire et évolution motrice d'enfants avec troubles de I'audition, ou avec troubles des apprentissages et dommages moteurs La fonction vestibulaire et l'évolution motrice de 30 enfants avec deficit auditif, et de 15 enfants avec troubles moteurs et insuffisance des apprentissages, ont été examinées pour déterminer si la perte vestibulaire peut intervenir dans les déficits de coordination motrice. Les résultats ont été comparés à ceux de 54 enfants sans trouble. La perte compléte ou la réduction de la fonction vestibulaire chez 20 enfants malentendants n'affectaient pas le développement de l'efficience motrice, exception faite des activités spécifiques de balancement. En revanche, les défauts d'organisation sensorielle dans le groupe des troubles d'apprentissage et chez trois des enfants malentendants étaient associés à des déficits étenduss de l'efficience motrice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-79
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Medicine & Child Neurology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1988

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this