Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution

Stephen Cheng, John R. Ragsdale, Anna W. Sasaki, Randall G. Lee, Clifford Deveney, C. Wright Pinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, improves myocardial preservation during cold cardioplegia and protects against renal damage during periods of warm and cold ischemia. To determine if verapamil could prevent ischemic damage to livers during and after cold storage, harvested rat livers were flushed with either University of Wisconsin (UW) solution or UW solution with 25 mg/liter verapamil. Twenty rats were used in each group. After 24 hr of storage at 4°C, livers were perfused with oxygenated blood through the portal veins for 2 hr at 37°C and pH 7.4. Liver enzymes, electrolytes, and perfusate flow rate were determined at 30-min intervals. At 90 min of perfusion, the verapamil group of livers had less elevation of AST (110 ± 17 IU/liter vs 172 ± 25 IU/liter, P <0.05), ALT (115 ± 21 IU/liter vs 210 ± 34 IU/liter, P <0.05), and LDH (962 ± 170 IU/liter vs 1452 ± 253 IU/liter, NS). Verapamil livers produced more bile than controls (6.9 ± 1.9 μl/g vs 2.3 ± 1.7 μl/g, P <0.05) and maintained a higher portal flow rate throughout the perfusion. Both groups showed similar reduction in liver weights after storage (3.9 ± 0.9% vs 2.8 ± 0.7%) and required the same amount of bicarbonate for correction of acidosis during perfusion (2.6 ± 0.2 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.2 mM). Light microscopic exam after perfusion showed hepatocyte damage in 30% of control livers, but 0% of verapamil livers. We conclude that verapamil-treated rat livers showed less damage and better function upon reperfusion after 24 hr of cold storage. This agent may be clinically useful as an additive to the UW preservation solution for livers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-564
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Verapamil
Liver
Perfusion
Cold Ischemia
Warm Ischemia
Induced Heart Arrest
Calcium Channel Blockers
Bicarbonates
Portal Vein
Acidosis
Bile
Electrolytes
Reperfusion
Hepatocytes
Kidney
Light
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Cheng, S., Ragsdale, J. R., Sasaki, A. W., Lee, R. G., Deveney, C., & Wright Pinson, C. (1991). Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution. Journal of Surgical Research, 50(6), 560-564. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-4804(91)90041-J

Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution. / Cheng, Stephen; Ragsdale, John R.; Sasaki, Anna W.; Lee, Randall G.; Deveney, Clifford; Wright Pinson, C.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 50, No. 6, 1991, p. 560-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, S, Ragsdale, JR, Sasaki, AW, Lee, RG, Deveney, C & Wright Pinson, C 1991, 'Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 560-564. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-4804(91)90041-J
Cheng, Stephen ; Ragsdale, John R. ; Sasaki, Anna W. ; Lee, Randall G. ; Deveney, Clifford ; Wright Pinson, C. / Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 1991 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 560-564.
@article{566c3982ff004af1b68a8751707920b5,
title = "Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution",
abstract = "Verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, improves myocardial preservation during cold cardioplegia and protects against renal damage during periods of warm and cold ischemia. To determine if verapamil could prevent ischemic damage to livers during and after cold storage, harvested rat livers were flushed with either University of Wisconsin (UW) solution or UW solution with 25 mg/liter verapamil. Twenty rats were used in each group. After 24 hr of storage at 4°C, livers were perfused with oxygenated blood through the portal veins for 2 hr at 37°C and pH 7.4. Liver enzymes, electrolytes, and perfusate flow rate were determined at 30-min intervals. At 90 min of perfusion, the verapamil group of livers had less elevation of AST (110 ± 17 IU/liter vs 172 ± 25 IU/liter, P <0.05), ALT (115 ± 21 IU/liter vs 210 ± 34 IU/liter, P <0.05), and LDH (962 ± 170 IU/liter vs 1452 ± 253 IU/liter, NS). Verapamil livers produced more bile than controls (6.9 ± 1.9 μl/g vs 2.3 ± 1.7 μl/g, P <0.05) and maintained a higher portal flow rate throughout the perfusion. Both groups showed similar reduction in liver weights after storage (3.9 ± 0.9{\%} vs 2.8 ± 0.7{\%}) and required the same amount of bicarbonate for correction of acidosis during perfusion (2.6 ± 0.2 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.2 mM). Light microscopic exam after perfusion showed hepatocyte damage in 30{\%} of control livers, but 0{\%} of verapamil livers. We conclude that verapamil-treated rat livers showed less damage and better function upon reperfusion after 24 hr of cold storage. This agent may be clinically useful as an additive to the UW preservation solution for livers.",
author = "Stephen Cheng and Ragsdale, {John R.} and Sasaki, {Anna W.} and Lee, {Randall G.} and Clifford Deveney and {Wright Pinson}, C.",
year = "1991",
doi = "10.1016/0022-4804(91)90041-J",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "560--564",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Verapamil improves rat hepatic preservation with UW solution

AU - Cheng, Stephen

AU - Ragsdale, John R.

AU - Sasaki, Anna W.

AU - Lee, Randall G.

AU - Deveney, Clifford

AU - Wright Pinson, C.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - Verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, improves myocardial preservation during cold cardioplegia and protects against renal damage during periods of warm and cold ischemia. To determine if verapamil could prevent ischemic damage to livers during and after cold storage, harvested rat livers were flushed with either University of Wisconsin (UW) solution or UW solution with 25 mg/liter verapamil. Twenty rats were used in each group. After 24 hr of storage at 4°C, livers were perfused with oxygenated blood through the portal veins for 2 hr at 37°C and pH 7.4. Liver enzymes, electrolytes, and perfusate flow rate were determined at 30-min intervals. At 90 min of perfusion, the verapamil group of livers had less elevation of AST (110 ± 17 IU/liter vs 172 ± 25 IU/liter, P <0.05), ALT (115 ± 21 IU/liter vs 210 ± 34 IU/liter, P <0.05), and LDH (962 ± 170 IU/liter vs 1452 ± 253 IU/liter, NS). Verapamil livers produced more bile than controls (6.9 ± 1.9 μl/g vs 2.3 ± 1.7 μl/g, P <0.05) and maintained a higher portal flow rate throughout the perfusion. Both groups showed similar reduction in liver weights after storage (3.9 ± 0.9% vs 2.8 ± 0.7%) and required the same amount of bicarbonate for correction of acidosis during perfusion (2.6 ± 0.2 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.2 mM). Light microscopic exam after perfusion showed hepatocyte damage in 30% of control livers, but 0% of verapamil livers. We conclude that verapamil-treated rat livers showed less damage and better function upon reperfusion after 24 hr of cold storage. This agent may be clinically useful as an additive to the UW preservation solution for livers.

AB - Verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, improves myocardial preservation during cold cardioplegia and protects against renal damage during periods of warm and cold ischemia. To determine if verapamil could prevent ischemic damage to livers during and after cold storage, harvested rat livers were flushed with either University of Wisconsin (UW) solution or UW solution with 25 mg/liter verapamil. Twenty rats were used in each group. After 24 hr of storage at 4°C, livers were perfused with oxygenated blood through the portal veins for 2 hr at 37°C and pH 7.4. Liver enzymes, electrolytes, and perfusate flow rate were determined at 30-min intervals. At 90 min of perfusion, the verapamil group of livers had less elevation of AST (110 ± 17 IU/liter vs 172 ± 25 IU/liter, P <0.05), ALT (115 ± 21 IU/liter vs 210 ± 34 IU/liter, P <0.05), and LDH (962 ± 170 IU/liter vs 1452 ± 253 IU/liter, NS). Verapamil livers produced more bile than controls (6.9 ± 1.9 μl/g vs 2.3 ± 1.7 μl/g, P <0.05) and maintained a higher portal flow rate throughout the perfusion. Both groups showed similar reduction in liver weights after storage (3.9 ± 0.9% vs 2.8 ± 0.7%) and required the same amount of bicarbonate for correction of acidosis during perfusion (2.6 ± 0.2 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.2 mM). Light microscopic exam after perfusion showed hepatocyte damage in 30% of control livers, but 0% of verapamil livers. We conclude that verapamil-treated rat livers showed less damage and better function upon reperfusion after 24 hr of cold storage. This agent may be clinically useful as an additive to the UW preservation solution for livers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025821398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025821398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0022-4804(91)90041-J

DO - 10.1016/0022-4804(91)90041-J

M3 - Article

C2 - 2051766

AN - SCOPUS:0025821398

VL - 50

SP - 560

EP - 564

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

IS - 6

ER -