Venous Resection in Urological Surgery

Brian Duty, Siamak Daneshmand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Complete removal of retroperitoneal and pelvic tumors may require resection or ligation of major retroperitoneal, pelvic and mesenteric venous structures. We provide an overview of venous anatomy and collateral drainage, and review the veins that can be safely resected. Materials and Methods: We reviewed major anatomical texts, and performed a directed MEDLINE® literature search of retroperitoneal, pelvic and mesenteric venous anatomy. Resection and reconstruction of these vessels were also reviewed with an emphasis on collateral blood flow and post-resection sequelae. Results: The infrarenal inferior vena cava, iliac veins, left renal vein, lumbar veins, inferior mesenteric vein and splenic vein may be resected or ligated without reconstruction. Resection of the right renal vein results in renal demise in the majority of instances. The portal vein may not be resected without reconstruction. Venous reconstruction may be performed with autologous or synthetic graft material. Conclusions: Most major veins in the body can be safely resected or ligated with minimal sequelae. However, it is imperative to understand venous anatomy and collateral blood flow to minimize intraoperative and postoperative complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2338-2342
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume180
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Veins
Anatomy
Renal Veins
Splenic Vein
Iliac Vein
Mesenteric Veins
Intraoperative Complications
Inferior Vena Cava
Portal Vein
MEDLINE
Ligation
Drainage
Transplants
Kidney
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • iliac vein
  • inferior
  • reconstructive surgical procedures
  • retroperitoneal space
  • vena cava

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Venous Resection in Urological Surgery. / Duty, Brian; Daneshmand, Siamak.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 180, No. 6, 12.2008, p. 2338-2342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duty, Brian ; Daneshmand, Siamak. / Venous Resection in Urological Surgery. In: Journal of Urology. 2008 ; Vol. 180, No. 6. pp. 2338-2342.
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