Vascular pathology and hearing disorders

Lingling Neng, Xiaorui Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transduction of sound is metabolically demanding, and normal function of the microvasculature in the inner ear is critical for maintaining endocochlear potential (EP), ion transport, and fluid balance. A reduction in blood flow to the ear leads to a shortage of nutrients and oxygen in the tissue, and creates a ‘toxic’ environment with accumulation of harmful metabolites. To sustain hearing acuity, a healthy cochlear microenvironment must be maintained. Dysfunction of blood supply has been identified in different forms of hearing loss, including in loud sound-induced hearing loss, age-related hearing loss, and genetic hearing loss. This short review focuses on recent findings in cochlear microvascular pathophysiology relevant to cochlear health and hearing loss. A better understanding of the role of the micro-circulation in the inner ear will provide a foundation for preventing and treating vascular associated hearing disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Physiology
Volume18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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