Validity and reliability of an adolescent and parent rating scale of type 1 diabetes adherence behaviors

The self-care inventory (SCI)

Adam B. Lewin, Annette M. Lagreca, Gary R. Geffken, Laura B. Williams, Danny Duke, Eric A. Storch, Janet H. Silverstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Accurate assessment of diabetes regimen adherence behaviors in youth is a challenging endeavor and is limited by a paucity of empirically supported measures. The purpose of this research is to further demonstrate the validity and reliability of the Self-Care Inventory (SCI), a youth and parent report measure of adherence with diabetes self-care behaviors. The SCI was chosen given its ease of implementation, applicability to multiple diabetes regimens, and dual parent/youth formats.MethodsParticipants were 164 youth with type 1 diabetes and a parent. Measures were administered at regular office visits to a tertiary care diabetes clinic.ResultsThe SCI has strong psychometric properties, including adequate internal consistency, parent-youth agreement, and test-retest agreement. Relations between the SCI and a structured interview of diabetes adherence (the Diabetes Self-Management Profile; DSMP) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were strong.ConclusionsIn addition to demonstrating strong psychometrics, this research provides independent support for the SCI. Thus, the SCI is consistent with recent criteria proposed by Quittner et al. (Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 33, 916-936) for an empirically supported measure of regimen adherence. Although other methods of accessing adherence may provide more comprehensive assessments, the brevity, ease-of-implementation, and robustness for multiple regimens makes the SCI an ideal tool for clinicians and researchers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1007
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume34
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Care
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Reproducibility of Results
Equipment and Supplies
Psychometrics
Child Psychology
Office Visits
Tertiary Healthcare
Research
Hemoglobins
Research Personnel
Interviews

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Children
  • Self-care inventory
  • Type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Validity and reliability of an adolescent and parent rating scale of type 1 diabetes adherence behaviors : The self-care inventory (SCI). / Lewin, Adam B.; Lagreca, Annette M.; Geffken, Gary R.; Williams, Laura B.; Duke, Danny; Storch, Eric A.; Silverstein, Janet H.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 9, 10.2009, p. 999-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewin, Adam B. ; Lagreca, Annette M. ; Geffken, Gary R. ; Williams, Laura B. ; Duke, Danny ; Storch, Eric A. ; Silverstein, Janet H. / Validity and reliability of an adolescent and parent rating scale of type 1 diabetes adherence behaviors : The self-care inventory (SCI). In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 34, No. 9. pp. 999-1007.
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