Validation of toolkit after-death bereaved family member interview

Joan Teno, Brian Clarridge, Virginia Casey, Susan Edgman-Levitan, Jack Fowler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Toolkit After-Death Bereaved Family Member Interview to measure quality of care at the end of life from the unique perspective of family members. The survey included proposed problem scores (a count of the opportunity to improve the quality of care) and scales. Data were collected through a retrospective telephone survey with a family member who was interviewed between 3 and 6 months after the death of the patient. The setting was an outpatient hospice service, a consortium of nursing homes, and a hospital in New England. One hundred fifty-six family members from across these settings participated. The 8 proposed domains of care, as represented by problem scores or scales, were based on a conceptual model of patient-focused, family-centered medical care. The survey design emphasized face validity in order to provide actionable information to health care providers. A correlational and factor analysis was undertaken of the 8 proposed problem scores or scales. Cronbach's alpha scores varied from 0.58 to 0.87, with two problem scores (each of which had only 3 survey items) having a low alpha of 0.58. The mean item-to-total correlations for the other problem scores varied from 0.36 to 0.69, and the mean item-to-item correlations were between 0.32 and 0.70. The proposed problem scores or scales, with the exception of closure and advance care planning, demonstrated a moderate correlation (i.e., from 0.44 to 0.52) with the overall rating of satisfaction (as measured by a five-point, 'excellent' to 'poor' scale). Family members of persons who died with hospice service reported fewer problems in each of the six domains of medical care, gave a higher rating of the quality of care, and reported higher self-efficacy in caring for their loved ones. These results indicate that 7 of the 8 proposed problem scores or scales demonstrated psychometric properties that warrant further testing. The domain of closure demonstrated a poor correlation with overall satisfaction and requires further work. This survey could provide information to help guide quality improvement efforts to enhance the care of the dying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)752-758
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interviews
Quality of Health Care
Hospices
Reproducibility of Results
Advance Care Planning
New England
Self Efficacy
Ambulatory Care
Quality Improvement
Nursing Homes
Telephone
Psychometrics
Health Personnel
Statistical Factor Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Dying
  • Quality of care
  • Terminal illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Validation of toolkit after-death bereaved family member interview. / Teno, Joan; Clarridge, Brian; Casey, Virginia; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Fowler, Jack.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 22, No. 3, 03.09.2001, p. 752-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teno, Joan ; Clarridge, Brian ; Casey, Virginia ; Edgman-Levitan, Susan ; Fowler, Jack. / Validation of toolkit after-death bereaved family member interview. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2001 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 752-758.
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