Validation of case-mix measures derived from self-reports of diagnoses and health

Vincent S. Fan, David Au, Patrick Heagerty, Richard (Rick) Deyo, Mary B. McDonell, Stephan D. Fihn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-reported chronic diseases and health status are associated with resource use. However, few data exist regarding their ability to predict mortality or hospitalizations. We sought to determine whether self-reported chronic medical conditions and the SF-36 could be used individually or in combination to assess co-morbidity in the outpatient setting. The study was designed as a prospective cohort study. Patients were enrolled in the primary care clinics at seven Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers participating in the Ambulatory Care Quality Improvement Project (ACQUIP). 10,947 patients, ≥ 50 years of age, enrolled in general internal medicine clinics who returned both a baseline health inventory checklist and the baseline SF-36 who were followed for a mean of 722.5 (±84.3) days. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality, with a secondary outcome of hospitalization within the VA system. Using a Cox proportional hazards model in a development set of 5,469 patients, a co-morbidity index [Seattle Index of Co-morbidity (SIC)] was constructed using information about age, smoking status and seven of 25 self-reported medical conditions that were associated with increased mortality. In the validation set of 5,478 patients, the SIC was predictive of both mortality and hospitalizations within the VA system. A separate model was constructed in which only age and the PCS and MCS scores of the SF-36 were entered to predict mortality. The SF-36 component scores and the SIC had comparable discriminatory ability (AUC for discrimination of death within 2 y 0.71 for both models). When combined, the SIC and SF-36 together had improved discrimination for mortality (AUC = 0.74, p-value for difference in AUC <0.005). A new outpatient co-morbidity score developed using self-identified chronic medical conditions on a baseline health inventory checklist was predictive of 2-y mortality and hospitalization within the VA system in general internal medicine patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-380
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diagnosis-Related Groups
Self Report
Morbidity
Veterans
Mortality
Health
Hospitalization
Area Under Curve
Aptitude
Internal Medicine
Checklist
Outpatients
Equipment and Supplies
Ambulatory Care
Quality Improvement
Proportional Hazards Models
Health Status
Primary Health Care
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • Co-morbidity
  • Confounding factors
  • Proportional hazards model
  • Quality of life
  • Questionnaires
  • ROC curve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Validation of case-mix measures derived from self-reports of diagnoses and health. / Fan, Vincent S.; Au, David; Heagerty, Patrick; Deyo, Richard (Rick); McDonell, Mary B.; Fihn, Stephan D.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 55, No. 4, 2002, p. 371-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fan, Vincent S. ; Au, David ; Heagerty, Patrick ; Deyo, Richard (Rick) ; McDonell, Mary B. ; Fihn, Stephan D. / Validation of case-mix measures derived from self-reports of diagnoses and health. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2002 ; Vol. 55, No. 4. pp. 371-380.
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