Uveal effusion after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy

Merina Thomas, Stephen T. Armenti, M. Bernadete Ayres, Hakan Demirci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IMPORTANCE Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including antiprogrammed cell death protein-1 (anti-PD-1) and antiprogrammed cell death ligand-1 (anti-PD-L1) monoclonal antibodies, have recently been introduced as a promising new immunotherapy for solid cancers. The adverse effects typically include inflammation of the skin, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems. OBJECTIVE To describe 3 patients who developed uveal effusion after initiating anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody therapy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This case series was conducted in a university-based ocular oncology practice. The participants were a 68-year-old African American man with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung and 2 white men, aged 52 years and 85 years, with metastatic cutaneous melanoma; all were taking anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Ocular findings of 3 patients. RESULTS We identified 3 patients who developed uveal effusion within 1 to 2 months after initiating anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody therapy. Uveal effusion resolved completely in 6 to 12 weeks after discontinuation of systemic therapy in 2 patients and persisted in 1 patient who continued the therapy. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Uveal effusion should be considered in patients taking anti-PD-1 and/or PD-L1 monoclonal antibody therapy. Because of the role of the PD-1 pathway in the inhibition of self-reactive T cells, PD-1 inhibition might lead to inflammation because of immune-related adverse effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-556
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA ophthalmology
Volume136
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Cell Death
Monoclonal Antibodies
Ligands
Therapeutics
Proteins
Reactive Inhibition
Inflammation
Skin
Endocrine System
African Americans
Immunotherapy
Melanoma
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Uveal effusion after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. / Thomas, Merina; Armenti, Stephen T.; Bernadete Ayres, M.; Demirci, Hakan.

In: JAMA ophthalmology, Vol. 136, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 553-556.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomas, M, Armenti, ST, Bernadete Ayres, M & Demirci, H 2018, 'Uveal effusion after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy', JAMA ophthalmology, vol. 136, no. 5, pp. 553-556. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.0920
Thomas, Merina ; Armenti, Stephen T. ; Bernadete Ayres, M. ; Demirci, Hakan. / Uveal effusion after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. In: JAMA ophthalmology. 2018 ; Vol. 136, No. 5. pp. 553-556.
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