Using Biomarkers to Predict Memantine Effects in Alzheimer's Disease: A Proposal and Proof-Of-Concept Demonstration

Neal R. Swerdlow, Juliana E. Kotz, Yash B. Joshi, Jo Talledo, Joyce Sprock, Juan L. Molina, Branko Huisa, Steven F. Huege, Jairo Alberto Romero, Michael J. Walsh, Lisa Delano-Wood, Gregory A. Light, Joseph Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Memantine's benefits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are modest and heterogeneous. We tested the feasibility of using sensitivity to acute memantine challenge to predict an individual's clinical response. Eight participants completed a double-blind challenge study of memantine (placebo versus 20 mg) effects on autonomic, subjective, cognitive, and neurophysiological measures, followed by a 24-week unblinded active-dose therapeutic trial (10 mg bid). Study participation was well tolerated. Subgroups based on memantine sensitivity on specific laboratory measures differed in their clinical response to memantine, some by large effect sizes. It appears feasible to use biomarkers to predict clinical sensitivity to memantine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1431-1438
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • event-related potentials
  • memantine
  • neurocognition
  • prepulse inhibition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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