Using a brief household food inventory as an environmental indicator of individual dietary practices

Ruth E. Patterson, Alan R. Kristal, Jackilen (Jackie) Shannon, Julie R. Hunt, Emily White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined whether foods in household pantries are an indicator of household members' diet. Methods. In a random-digit-dial survey, the presence in the house of 15 high-fat foods was assessed with whoever answered the phone. A randomly selected household member was surveyed about diet-related behaviors (n = 1002). Results. Individuals in the precontemplation stage of dietary change had more high-fat foods in their pantry than those in maintenance (means of 7.4 and 5.8, respectively). Individuals with low-fat pantries had an intake of 32% energy from fat vs 37% for those with high-fat pantries. Conclusions. Household food inventories are a practical and valid approach to monitoring dietary behaviors in community- based studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-275
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume87
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Fats
Food
Equipment and Supplies
Diet
Energy Intake
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Patterson, R. E., Kristal, A. R., Shannon, J. J., Hunt, J. R., & White, E. (1997). Using a brief household food inventory as an environmental indicator of individual dietary practices. American Journal of Public Health, 87(2), 272-275.

Using a brief household food inventory as an environmental indicator of individual dietary practices. / Patterson, Ruth E.; Kristal, Alan R.; Shannon, Jackilen (Jackie); Hunt, Julie R.; White, Emily.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 87, No. 2, 02.1997, p. 272-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patterson, RE, Kristal, AR, Shannon, JJ, Hunt, JR & White, E 1997, 'Using a brief household food inventory as an environmental indicator of individual dietary practices', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 87, no. 2, pp. 272-275.
Patterson, Ruth E. ; Kristal, Alan R. ; Shannon, Jackilen (Jackie) ; Hunt, Julie R. ; White, Emily. / Using a brief household food inventory as an environmental indicator of individual dietary practices. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1997 ; Vol. 87, No. 2. pp. 272-275.
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