Usefulness of Maintaining a Normal Electrocardiogram Over Time for Predicting Cardiovascular Health

Elsayed Z. Soliman, Zhu Ming Zhang, Lin Y. Chen, Larisa Tereshchenko, Dan Arking, Alvaro Alonso

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We hypothesized that maintaining a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) status over time is associated with low cardiovascular (CV) disease in a dose-response fashion and subsequently could be used to monitor programs aimed at promoting CV health. This analysis included 4,856 CV disease-free participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study who had a normal ECG at baseline (1987 to 1989) and complete electrocardiographic data in subsequent 3 visits (1990 to 1992, 1993 to 1995, and 1996 to 1998). Participants were classified based on maintaining their normal ECG status during these 4 visits into “maintained,” “not maintained,” or “inconsistent” normal ECG status as defined by the Minnesota ECG classification. CV disease events (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and stroke) were adjudicated from Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities visit-4 through 2010. Over a median follow-up of 13.2 years, 885 CV disease events occurred. The incidence rate of CV disease events was lowest among study participants who maintained a normal ECG status, followed by those with an inconsistent pattern, and then those who did not maintain their normal ECG status (trend p value <0.001). Similarly, the greater the number of visits with a normal ECG status, the lower was the incidence rate of CV disease events (trend p value <0.001). Maintaining (vs not maintaining) a normal ECG status was associated with a lower risk of CV disease, which was lower than that observed in those with inconsistent normal ECG pattern (trend p value <0.01). In conclusion, maintaining a normal ECG status over time is associated with low risk of CV disease in a dose-response fashion, suggesting its potential use as a monitoring tool for programs promoting CV health.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)249-255
    Number of pages7
    JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
    Volume119
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 15 2017

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    Electrocardiography
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Health
    Atherosclerosis
    Incidence
    Coronary Disease
    Heart Failure
    Stroke

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Usefulness of Maintaining a Normal Electrocardiogram Over Time for Predicting Cardiovascular Health. / Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Zhang, Zhu Ming; Chen, Lin Y.; Tereshchenko, Larisa; Arking, Dan; Alonso, Alvaro.

    In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 119, No. 2, 15.01.2017, p. 249-255.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Soliman, Elsayed Z. ; Zhang, Zhu Ming ; Chen, Lin Y. ; Tereshchenko, Larisa ; Arking, Dan ; Alonso, Alvaro. / Usefulness of Maintaining a Normal Electrocardiogram Over Time for Predicting Cardiovascular Health. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2017 ; Vol. 119, No. 2. pp. 249-255.
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