Use of Risk Model for Assessment of Residents' Perception of Complexity of Surgical Steps: Example of Modular Component Steps of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery

Jeffrey S. Raskin, Jesse J. Liu, Katherine Holste, Sarah Brown, Fran Hardaway, Priscilla Pang, Ahmed M. Raslan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Quality improvement projects increasingly emphasize standardization of surgical work flow to optimize operative room efficiency. Removing special cause variability resulting from nonsurgical waste is an obvious target; however, resident surgical education must be maintained, even in the setting of process improvement. OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of resident-identified "risky" or "uncomfortable" procedural steps on operative time during transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). METHODS: TLIF procedure steps were defined. An 8 2-part questions survey regarding comfort level and perceived risk assessment at each step was developed and completed by junior (17) and senior residents (10), and by faculty (6) from orthopedic, and neurological surgery. A risk matrix was constructed defining 2 zones: a "danger zone"; responses were high risk (3-5) and low comfort (1-3), and a "safe zone"; responses were low risk (1-2) and high comfort (4-5). One-tailed Chi-square with Yates correction was performed. RESULTS: Risk matrix analysis showed a statistical difference among "danger zone" respondents between junior resident and faculty groups for exposure, pedicle screw placement, neural decompression, interbody placement, posterolateral fusion, and hemostasis. A radar graph identifies percent of respondents who fall within the "danger zone". CONCLUSION: Resident perception of surgical complexity can be evaluated for procedural steps using a risk matrix survey. For TLIF, residents may assign more risk and may be less comfortable performing steps in a training-level-dependent manner. Identification of particular high-risk or uncomfortable steps should prompt strict faculty oversight to improve patient safety, monitor resident education, and reduce operative time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-187
Number of pages10
JournalOperative neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Keywords

  • Quality improvement
  • Resident education
  • Risk matrix

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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