Use of Doppler color flow mapping in the echocardiographic determination of cardiac output

B. D. Hoit, L. M. Valdes-Cruz, David Sahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our studies indicate that aortic flows using the color flow diameter were more accurate at low cardiac outputs, suggesting that color Doppler may be particularly valuable in these low flow states. Color flow imaging of mitral inflow is clearly more complex than aortic flow. This may be due to the funnel-shape of the mitral apparatus, vortex formation and swirling in the left ventricle, as well as a bimodal filling pattern dependent not only on the flow state, but on the left ventricular compliance. In view of the complex flow patterns, it is not surprising that cardiac output using color flow diameters from the mitral valve were not as accurate as estimates obtained from anatomical diameters. For all four cardiac valves, flow diameters using color flow mapping are significantly less than two-dimensional echocardiographically derived anatomical diameters. Generally, output determinations using color flow Doppler were not as accurate as those using anatomical diameters. These findings are probably due to low velocity threshold cutoffs, low signal to noise ratios, and gain dependence of the area of flow imaging with current Doppler systems. However, it seems that, particularly in low output states, where flow may not fill the whole vessel or valve orifice, color Doppler flow-mapping technology can be useful for cardiac output determinations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)535-542
Number of pages8
JournalEchocardiography
Volume4
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1987

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Cardiac Output
Color
Low Cardiac Output
Heart Valves
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Mitral Valve
Compliance
Heart Ventricles
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Hoit, B. D., Valdes-Cruz, L. M., & Sahn, D. (1987). Use of Doppler color flow mapping in the echocardiographic determination of cardiac output. Echocardiography, 4(6), 535-542.

Use of Doppler color flow mapping in the echocardiographic determination of cardiac output. / Hoit, B. D.; Valdes-Cruz, L. M.; Sahn, David.

In: Echocardiography, Vol. 4, No. 6, 1987, p. 535-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoit, BD, Valdes-Cruz, LM & Sahn, D 1987, 'Use of Doppler color flow mapping in the echocardiographic determination of cardiac output', Echocardiography, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 535-542.
Hoit, B. D. ; Valdes-Cruz, L. M. ; Sahn, David. / Use of Doppler color flow mapping in the echocardiographic determination of cardiac output. In: Echocardiography. 1987 ; Vol. 4, No. 6. pp. 535-542.
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