Urea signaling to ERK phosphorylation in renal medullary cells requires extracellular calcium but not calcium entry

Xiao Yan Yang, Hongyu Zhao, Zheng Zhang, Karin D. Rodland, Jean-Baptiste Roullet, David Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The renal cell line mIMCD3 exhibits markedly upregulated phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 in response to urea treatment (200 mM for 5 min). Previous data have suggested the involvement of a classical protein kinase C (cPKC)-dependent pathway in downstream events related to urea signaling. We now show that urea-inducible ERK activation requires extracellular calcium; unexpectedly, it occurs independently of activation of cPKC isoforms. Pharmacological inhibitors of known intracellular calcium release pathways and extracellular calcium entry pathways fail to inhibit ERK activation by urea. Fura 2 ratiometry was used to assess the effect of urea treatment on intracellular calcium mobilization. In single-cell analyses using subconfluent monolayers and in population-wide analyses using both confluent monolayers and cells in suspension, urea failed to increase intracellular calcium concentration. Taken together, these data indicate that urea-inducible ERK activation requires calcium action but not calcium entry. Although direct evidence is lacking, one possible explanation could include involvement of a calcium-dependent extracellular moiety of a cell surface-associated protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology
Volume280
Issue number1 49-1
StatePublished - Jan 2001

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Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases
Urea
Phosphorylation
Calcium
Kidney
Protein Kinase C
Single-Cell Analysis
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1
Suspensions
Protein Isoforms
Membrane Proteins
Pharmacology
Cell Line
Population

Keywords

  • Fura 2
  • Hypotonicity
  • Inner medullary collecting duct
  • Madin-Darby canine kidney
  • Protein kinase C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Urea signaling to ERK phosphorylation in renal medullary cells requires extracellular calcium but not calcium entry. / Yang, Xiao Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhang, Zheng; Rodland, Karin D.; Roullet, Jean-Baptiste; Cohen, David.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, Vol. 280, No. 1 49-1, 01.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Xiao Yan ; Zhao, Hongyu ; Zhang, Zheng ; Rodland, Karin D. ; Roullet, Jean-Baptiste ; Cohen, David. / Urea signaling to ERK phosphorylation in renal medullary cells requires extracellular calcium but not calcium entry. In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology. 2001 ; Vol. 280, No. 1 49-1.
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