Type-2 diabetes mellitus: does prenatal care affect outcomes?

Allison J. Allen, Jonathan Snowden, Bernard Lau, Yvonne Cheng, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if prenatal care affects adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Study design: This was a retrospective cohort study of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes mellitus pregnancies in the state of California between 1997 and 2006, using vital statistics data linked to birth certificates. Women were stratified by time of presentation to care and we compared those who presented in the first trimester, third trimester, and those who had no prenatal care prior to delivery. Perinatal outcomes looked at included: preeclampsia, macrosomia, preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, and intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD). The two groups were compared with chi-squared testing to determine statistical significance. Results: In women with pregestational diabetes those who presented at time of delivery had an 11.3% risk of IUFD compared to 0.9% in those who presented in the first trimester. There was also an increased rate of preterm birth in the late presentation cohort (29.4% at time of delivery versus 21.0% in the first trimester). After adjusting for possible confounding variables using logistic regression models, rates of IUFD and preterm delivery were still found to be statistically significant with adjusted odds ratios of 11.37 (95% CI: 6.10–21.16) and 1.55 (95% CI: 1.03–2.32), respectively. There were no differences in rates of macrosomia or preeclampsia between the three cohorts. Conclusions: Treatment of T2DM throughout pregnancy leads to improved maternal and neonatal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 15 2017

Fingerprint

Fetal Death
Prenatal Care
First Pregnancy Trimester
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnant Women
Logistic Models
Birth Certificates
Pregnancy
Vital Statistics
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Premature Birth
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • pregnancy
  • prenatal care
  • T2DM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Type-2 diabetes mellitus : does prenatal care affect outcomes? / Allen, Allison J.; Snowden, Jonathan; Lau, Bernard; Cheng, Yvonne; Caughey, Aaron.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, 15.02.2017, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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