Tuberculosis Infectiousness and Host Susceptibility

Richard D. Turner, Christopher Chiu, Gavin J. Churchyard, Hanif Esmail, David Lewinsohn, Neel R. Gandhi, Kevin P. Fennelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transmission of tuberculosis is complex. Necessary factors include a source case with respiratory disease that has developed sufficiently for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to be present in the airways. Viable bacilli must then be released as an aerosol via the respiratory tract of the source case. This is presumed to occur predominantly by coughing but may also happen by other means. Airborne bacilli must be capable of surviving in the external environment before inhalation into a new potential host-steps influenced by ambient conditions and crowding and by M. tuberculosis itself. Innate and adaptive host defenses will then influence whether new infection results; a process that is difficult to study owing to a paucity of animal models and an inability to measure infection directly. This review offers an overview of these steps and highlights the many gaps in knowledge that remain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S636-S643
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume216
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Bacillus
Tuberculosis
Infection
Aerosols
Respiratory System
Inhalation
Animal Models

Keywords

  • infectiousness
  • susceptibility
  • transmission
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Turner, R. D., Chiu, C., Churchyard, G. J., Esmail, H., Lewinsohn, D., Gandhi, N. R., & Fennelly, K. P. (2017). Tuberculosis Infectiousness and Host Susceptibility. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 216, S636-S643. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix361

Tuberculosis Infectiousness and Host Susceptibility. / Turner, Richard D.; Chiu, Christopher; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Esmail, Hanif; Lewinsohn, David; Gandhi, Neel R.; Fennelly, Kevin P.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 216, 01.01.2017, p. S636-S643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turner, RD, Chiu, C, Churchyard, GJ, Esmail, H, Lewinsohn, D, Gandhi, NR & Fennelly, KP 2017, 'Tuberculosis Infectiousness and Host Susceptibility', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 216, pp. S636-S643. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix361
Turner RD, Chiu C, Churchyard GJ, Esmail H, Lewinsohn D, Gandhi NR et al. Tuberculosis Infectiousness and Host Susceptibility. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 Jan 1;216:S636-S643. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix361
Turner, Richard D. ; Chiu, Christopher ; Churchyard, Gavin J. ; Esmail, Hanif ; Lewinsohn, David ; Gandhi, Neel R. ; Fennelly, Kevin P. / Tuberculosis Infectiousness and Host Susceptibility. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 216. pp. S636-S643.
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