Trochanteric soft tissue thickness and hip fracture in older men

Carrie Nielson, Mary L. Bouxsein, Sinara S. Freitas, Kristine E. Ensrud, Eric Orwoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Greater thickness of the tissue extending laterally from the greater trochanter has been associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in women. The effect of trochanteric soft tissue thickness on the risk of incident hip fracture has not been evaluated in men. Methods: We measured trochanteric soft tissue thickness by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for all incident hip fracture cases (n = 70) and 222 randomly selected noncases in older men (≥65 yr) enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Differences in tissue thickness between cases and controls were examined. Changes in fall force and factor-of-risk (the ratio of force from a sideways fall to femoral bone strength) associated with tissue thickness were determined. The relative risk for incident hip fracture per SD decrease in tissue thickness was calculated. Results: Mean trochanteric soft tissue thickness did not differ significantly between cases and noncases (29.1 ± 11.9 vs 31.0 ± 11.5 mm; P = 0.2). Although increased tissue thickness reduced both the estimates of fall force and the factor-of-risk, tissue thickness was not associated with the risk of hip fracture (age- and bone mineral density-adjusted relative risk per SD decrease in tissue thickness = 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-1.16). Conclusions: In this study of elderly community-dwelling men, we found no significant association between trochanteric soft tissue thickness and incident hip fracture. Trochanteric soft tissue thickness in these men was less than previously reported in older women and may explain the difference between these results and those reported in women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-496
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Hip Fractures
Tissue
Bone
Pelvic Bones
Independent Living
Osteoporotic Fractures
Thromboplastin
Thigh
Bone Density
Femur
Minerals
Odds Ratio
X-Rays
Confidence Intervals
Bone and Bones
X rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Trochanteric soft tissue thickness and hip fracture in older men. / Nielson, Carrie; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Freitas, Sinara S.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Orwoll, Eric.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 94, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 491-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nielson, Carrie ; Bouxsein, Mary L. ; Freitas, Sinara S. ; Ensrud, Kristine E. ; Orwoll, Eric. / Trochanteric soft tissue thickness and hip fracture in older men. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2009 ; Vol. 94, No. 2. pp. 491-496.
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