Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein margination

A potential surrogate for whole-body lipoprotein lipase activity and effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids

Yongsoon Park, Philip G. Jones, William Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Margination occurs when blood borne particles attach to the vessel wall. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein (TRL) particles marginale when they bind to endothelial lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Objective: This study was undertaken to determine whether TRL margination reflects in vivo LpL activity and whether n-3 fatty acids affect fasting and fed TRL margination. Design: Healthy subjects (n = 33) began with a 4-wk, placebo (olive oil; 4 g/d) run-in period and were then randomly assigned to 4 wk of treatment with 4 g/d of ethyl esters of either safflower oil (SAF; control), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Margination volume (MV) was calculated by subtracting true from apparent plasma volume. Results: MVs were 3 times as great during the fasting state as during the fed state (P <0.0001). In both the fasting and the fed states, MV was significantly correlated with plasma triacylglycerol and TRL half-lives. In the fed state, MV was also correlated with preheparin LpL, whereas in the fasting state it was not. There was no significant correlation between preheparin LpL and postheparin LpL in the fasting state. Relative to SAF, EPA and DHA supplementation resulted in higher MVs by 64% and 53% (both P <0.001), respectively, in the fasting state, without significantly reducing fasting triacylglycerol concentrations. In the fed state, DHA doubled the MV (P <0.05), whereas EPA had no significant effect. Conclusions: The correlations between MV and TRL half-lives and preheparin LpL suggest that MV could be a reflection of whole-body LpL binding capacity. The increases in MVs with EPA and DHA supplementation suggest that these fatty acids may increase the amount of endothelial-bound LpL or its affinity for TRL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-50
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume80
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eicosapentaenoic Acid
lipoprotein lipase
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Lipoprotein Lipase
eicosapentaenoic acid
docosahexaenoic acid
lipoproteins
Lipoproteins
Triglycerides
fasting
triacylglycerols
Fasting
half life
Safflower Oil
safflower oil
Plasma Volume
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
binding capacity
olive oil
omega-3 fatty acids

Keywords

  • Chylomicrons
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Lipoprotein lipase
  • Margination
  • N-3 fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein margination : A potential surrogate for whole-body lipoprotein lipase activity and effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. / Park, Yongsoon; Jones, Philip G.; Harris, William.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 80, No. 1, 07.2004, p. 45-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein margination: A potential surrogate for whole-body lipoprotein lipase activity and effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids",
abstract = "Background: Margination occurs when blood borne particles attach to the vessel wall. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein (TRL) particles marginale when they bind to endothelial lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Objective: This study was undertaken to determine whether TRL margination reflects in vivo LpL activity and whether n-3 fatty acids affect fasting and fed TRL margination. Design: Healthy subjects (n = 33) began with a 4-wk, placebo (olive oil; 4 g/d) run-in period and were then randomly assigned to 4 wk of treatment with 4 g/d of ethyl esters of either safflower oil (SAF; control), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Margination volume (MV) was calculated by subtracting true from apparent plasma volume. Results: MVs were 3 times as great during the fasting state as during the fed state (P <0.0001). In both the fasting and the fed states, MV was significantly correlated with plasma triacylglycerol and TRL half-lives. In the fed state, MV was also correlated with preheparin LpL, whereas in the fasting state it was not. There was no significant correlation between preheparin LpL and postheparin LpL in the fasting state. Relative to SAF, EPA and DHA supplementation resulted in higher MVs by 64{\%} and 53{\%} (both P <0.001), respectively, in the fasting state, without significantly reducing fasting triacylglycerol concentrations. In the fed state, DHA doubled the MV (P <0.05), whereas EPA had no significant effect. Conclusions: The correlations between MV and TRL half-lives and preheparin LpL suggest that MV could be a reflection of whole-body LpL binding capacity. The increases in MVs with EPA and DHA supplementation suggest that these fatty acids may increase the amount of endothelial-bound LpL or its affinity for TRL.",
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AU - Jones, Philip G.

AU - Harris, William

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N2 - Background: Margination occurs when blood borne particles attach to the vessel wall. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein (TRL) particles marginale when they bind to endothelial lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Objective: This study was undertaken to determine whether TRL margination reflects in vivo LpL activity and whether n-3 fatty acids affect fasting and fed TRL margination. Design: Healthy subjects (n = 33) began with a 4-wk, placebo (olive oil; 4 g/d) run-in period and were then randomly assigned to 4 wk of treatment with 4 g/d of ethyl esters of either safflower oil (SAF; control), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Margination volume (MV) was calculated by subtracting true from apparent plasma volume. Results: MVs were 3 times as great during the fasting state as during the fed state (P <0.0001). In both the fasting and the fed states, MV was significantly correlated with plasma triacylglycerol and TRL half-lives. In the fed state, MV was also correlated with preheparin LpL, whereas in the fasting state it was not. There was no significant correlation between preheparin LpL and postheparin LpL in the fasting state. Relative to SAF, EPA and DHA supplementation resulted in higher MVs by 64% and 53% (both P <0.001), respectively, in the fasting state, without significantly reducing fasting triacylglycerol concentrations. In the fed state, DHA doubled the MV (P <0.05), whereas EPA had no significant effect. Conclusions: The correlations between MV and TRL half-lives and preheparin LpL suggest that MV could be a reflection of whole-body LpL binding capacity. The increases in MVs with EPA and DHA supplementation suggest that these fatty acids may increase the amount of endothelial-bound LpL or its affinity for TRL.

AB - Background: Margination occurs when blood borne particles attach to the vessel wall. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein (TRL) particles marginale when they bind to endothelial lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Objective: This study was undertaken to determine whether TRL margination reflects in vivo LpL activity and whether n-3 fatty acids affect fasting and fed TRL margination. Design: Healthy subjects (n = 33) began with a 4-wk, placebo (olive oil; 4 g/d) run-in period and were then randomly assigned to 4 wk of treatment with 4 g/d of ethyl esters of either safflower oil (SAF; control), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Margination volume (MV) was calculated by subtracting true from apparent plasma volume. Results: MVs were 3 times as great during the fasting state as during the fed state (P <0.0001). In both the fasting and the fed states, MV was significantly correlated with plasma triacylglycerol and TRL half-lives. In the fed state, MV was also correlated with preheparin LpL, whereas in the fasting state it was not. There was no significant correlation between preheparin LpL and postheparin LpL in the fasting state. Relative to SAF, EPA and DHA supplementation resulted in higher MVs by 64% and 53% (both P <0.001), respectively, in the fasting state, without significantly reducing fasting triacylglycerol concentrations. In the fed state, DHA doubled the MV (P <0.05), whereas EPA had no significant effect. Conclusions: The correlations between MV and TRL half-lives and preheparin LpL suggest that MV could be a reflection of whole-body LpL binding capacity. The increases in MVs with EPA and DHA supplementation suggest that these fatty acids may increase the amount of endothelial-bound LpL or its affinity for TRL.

KW - Chylomicrons

KW - Docosahexaenoic acid

KW - Eicosapentaenoic acid

KW - Lipoprotein lipase

KW - Margination

KW - N-3 fatty acids

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