Trends in research participant categories and descriptions in abstracts from the International BCI Meeting series, 1999 to 2016

Brandon S. Eddy, Sean C. Garrett, Sneha Rajen, Betts Peters, Jack Wiedrick, Deirdre McLaughlin, Abigail O’Connor, Ashley Renda, Jane E. Huggins, Melanie Fried-Oken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Much brain-computer interface (BCI) research is intended to benefit people with disabilities (PWD), though they are rarely included as study participants. When included, a range of clinical and non-clinical descriptions are used leading to difficulty interpreting and replicating results. We examined trends in inclusion and description of study participants with disabilities across six International BCI Meetings from 1999 to 2016. Meeting abstracts were analyzed by trained independent reviewers. Results suggested declines in participation by PWD across Meetings until the 2016 Meeting. Fifty-eight percent of abstracts identified PWD as end-users, though only twenty-two percent included participants with disabilities, suggesting evidence of a persistent translational gap. Increased diagnostic specificity was noted at the 2013 and 2016 Meetings. Studies often identified physical and/or communication impairments in participants with disabilities versus impairments in other areas. Implementing participatory action research principles and user-centered design strategies within BCI research is critical to bridge the translational gap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-24
Number of pages12
JournalBrain-Computer Interfaces
Volume6
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Brain-Computer Interfaces
Brain computer interface
Disabled Persons
Research
Health Services Research
Communication

Keywords

  • biomedical engineering
  • biomedical technology
  • Brain-Computer Interfaces
  • disabled persons
  • rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Trends in research participant categories and descriptions in abstracts from the International BCI Meeting series, 1999 to 2016. / Eddy, Brandon S.; Garrett, Sean C.; Rajen, Sneha; Peters, Betts; Wiedrick, Jack; McLaughlin, Deirdre; O’Connor, Abigail; Renda, Ashley; Huggins, Jane E.; Fried-Oken, Melanie.

In: Brain-Computer Interfaces, Vol. 6, No. 1-2, 01.01.2019, p. 13-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eddy, BS, Garrett, SC, Rajen, S, Peters, B, Wiedrick, J, McLaughlin, D, O’Connor, A, Renda, A, Huggins, JE & Fried-Oken, M 2019, 'Trends in research participant categories and descriptions in abstracts from the International BCI Meeting series, 1999 to 2016', Brain-Computer Interfaces, vol. 6, no. 1-2, pp. 13-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/2326263X.2019.1643203
Eddy, Brandon S. ; Garrett, Sean C. ; Rajen, Sneha ; Peters, Betts ; Wiedrick, Jack ; McLaughlin, Deirdre ; O’Connor, Abigail ; Renda, Ashley ; Huggins, Jane E. ; Fried-Oken, Melanie. / Trends in research participant categories and descriptions in abstracts from the International BCI Meeting series, 1999 to 2016. In: Brain-Computer Interfaces. 2019 ; Vol. 6, No. 1-2. pp. 13-24.
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