Trends and correlates of child passenger restraint use in 6 northwest tribes: The native children always ride safe (Native CARS) project

Jodi Lapidus, Nicole Holdaway Smith, Tam Lutz, Beth E. Ebel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We compared proportions of children properly restrained in vehicles in 6 Northwest American Indian tribes in 2003 and 2009, and evaluated risks for improper restraint. Methods. During spring 2009 we conducted a vehicle observation survey in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho tribal communities. We estimated the proportions of children riding properly restrained and evaluated correlates of improper restraint via log-binomial regression models for clustered data. Results. We observed 1853 children aged 12 years and younger in 1207 vehicles; 49% rode properly restrained. More children aged 8 years and younger rode properly restrained in 2009 than 2003 (51% vs 29%; P <.001). Older booster seat-eligible children were least likely to ride properly restrained in 2009 (25%). American Indian children were more likely to ride improperly restrained than nonnative children in the same communities. Other risk factors included riding with an unrestrained or nonparent driver, riding where child passenger restraint laws were weaker than national guidelines, and taking a short trip. Conclusions. Although proper restraint has increased, it remains low. Tribe-initiated interventions to improve child passenger restraint use are under way.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-361
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Population Groups
North American Indians
Statistical Models
Observation
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Trends and correlates of child passenger restraint use in 6 northwest tribes : The native children always ride safe (Native CARS) project. / Lapidus, Jodi; Smith, Nicole Holdaway; Lutz, Tam; Ebel, Beth E.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 103, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 355-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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