Treatment Refusal in Arizona's Jail-Based Competency to Stand Trial Restoration Programs

Joseph Bloom, Scott E. Kirkorsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2003, Arizona began a jail-based restoration to competency program for detainees in its largest jail system in Phoenix. Today, jail-based competency programs have become the rule statewide to the degree that very few incompetent detainees are now referred to the Arizona State Hospital for restoration services. This article focuses on the topic of treatment refusal and the use of forced medications for detainees who are in these jail-based restoration programs. We describe Arizona's novel statewide jail-based programs, Arizona's statutory and case law approach to treatment refusal, and the restoration to competency programs in one large county jail that has no legal mechanism outside of civil commitment for the determination of whether forced treatment will be permitted. We conclude with a discussion of specific override procedures that might apply directly to incompetent detainees in a jail-based competency restoration program and whether the use of these procedures is prudent in a jail environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-239
Number of pages7
JournalThe journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Treatment Refusal
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Treatment Refusal in Arizona's Jail-Based Competency to Stand Trial Restoration Programs. / Bloom, Joseph; Kirkorsky, Scott E.

In: The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.06.2019, p. 233-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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