Treatment of acute renal artery occlusion after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

A. Kazmers, Gregory (Greg) Moneta, J. D. Harley, M. L. Goldman, A. W. Clowes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four patients with occlusive complications after percutaneous transluminal renal artery angioplasty (PTA) have been treated from July 1, 1984, to March 14, 1988. During this interval such renal artery angioplasties were performed in 44 patients. Two resulted in complete main renal artery occlusion, one angioplasty resulted in occlusion of a stenotic renal artery bypass graft, and one renal PTA resulted in segmental branch renal artery narrowing, which was thought to represent a dissection. The latter segmental renal artery narrowing was treated expectantly with good long-term results. One of the main renal artery occlusions was treated by radiologic means by reentry and repeat transluminal dilation. The other two acute complete occlusions, one of an autogenous artery and the other of an aortorenal bypass graft, were treated by aortorenal or ileorenal bypass grafting, respectively. The overall incidence of main renal artery occlusion (including the bypass graft occlusion) after PTA requiring operative intervention was 4.5% (2/44). Revascularization was accomplished after 6 and 8 hours of renal ischemia time for the two surgical procedures. Despite this, the bypass grafts done emergently remain patent, and the involved kidneys appear to be functional. The incidence of main renal artery occlusion after PTA is not as low as would be apparent from a review of the literature. It is proposed that main renal artery occlusion after PTA can be treated successfully by surgical and interventional radiologic techniques because of the presence of protective renal collateral circulation whose formation was stimulated by the renal artery lesion that prompted PTA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-492
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Renal Artery
Angioplasty
Therapeutics
Transplants
Kidney
Collateral Circulation
Renal Circulation
Incidence
Dissection
Dilatation
Ischemia
Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Kazmers, A., Moneta, G. G., Harley, J. D., Goldman, M. L., & Clowes, A. W. (1989). Treatment of acute renal artery occlusion after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 9(3), 487-492.

Treatment of acute renal artery occlusion after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. / Kazmers, A.; Moneta, Gregory (Greg); Harley, J. D.; Goldman, M. L.; Clowes, A. W.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 9, No. 3, 1989, p. 487-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kazmers, A, Moneta, GG, Harley, JD, Goldman, ML & Clowes, AW 1989, 'Treatment of acute renal artery occlusion after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 487-492.
Kazmers, A. ; Moneta, Gregory (Greg) ; Harley, J. D. ; Goldman, M. L. ; Clowes, A. W. / Treatment of acute renal artery occlusion after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1989 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 487-492.
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