Trauma Systems: Current Status—Future Challenges

John G. West, Michael J. Williams, Donald Trunkey, Charles C. Wolferth

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    124 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The national status of regional trauma system development was evaluated by a survey sent to all state emergency medical services directors and state chairpersons of the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. Eight essential components of a regional trauma system based on criteria set forth by the American College of Surgeons were listed. Only two states were found to have all components and statewide coverage. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia lacked one or more components of a regional trauma system. The remaining 29 states had yet to initiate the process of trauma center designation. In response to these shortcomings, an attempt was made to define the barriers to trauma system implementation and a step-by-step process was outlined for the development, management, and analysis of a comprehensive system of trauma care.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3597-3600
    Number of pages4
    JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
    Volume259
    Issue number24
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 24 1988

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    Wounds and Injuries
    Physician Executives
    Trauma Centers
    Emergency Medical Services

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Trauma Systems : Current Status—Future Challenges. / West, John G.; Williams, Michael J.; Trunkey, Donald; Wolferth, Charles C.

    In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 259, No. 24, 24.06.1988, p. 3597-3600.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    West, John G. ; Williams, Michael J. ; Trunkey, Donald ; Wolferth, Charles C. / Trauma Systems : Current Status—Future Challenges. In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. 1988 ; Vol. 259, No. 24. pp. 3597-3600.
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