Transfer of neutralizing IgG to macaques 6 h but not 24 h after SHIV infection confers sterilizing protection: Implications for HIV-1 vaccine development

Yoshiaki Nishimura, Tatsuhiko Igarashi, Nancy Haigwood, Reza Sadjadpour, Olivia K. Donau, Charles Buckler, Ron J. Plishka, Alicia Buckler-White, Malcolm A. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Passive transfer of high-titered antiviral neutralizing IgG, known to confer sterilizing immunity in pig-tailed monkeys, has been used to determine how soon after virus exposure neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) must be present to block a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV chimeric virus infection. Sterilizing protection was achieved in three of four macaques receiving neutralizing IgG 6 h after intravenous SIV/HIV chimeric virus inoculation as monitored by PCR analyses of and attempted virus isolations from plasma, peripheral blood mononuclear cell, and lymph node specimens. In the fourth animal, the production of progeny virus was suppressed for >4 weeks. A delay in transferring NAbs until 24 h after virus challenge resulted in infection in two of two monkeys. These results suggest that even if a vaccine capable of eliciting broadly reactive NAbs against primary HIV-1 were at hand, the Abs generated must remain at, or rapidly achieve, high levels within a relatively short period after exposure to virus to prevent the establishment of a primate lentivirus infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15131-15136
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume100
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 9 2003
Externally publishedYes

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AIDS Vaccines
Macaca
HIV-1
Immunoglobulin G
Viruses
Infection
Neutralizing Antibodies
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
Lentivirus Infections
Primate Lentiviruses
Macaca nemestrina
HIV
Virus Diseases
Haplorhini
Antiviral Agents
Immunity
Blood Cells
Vaccines
Hand
Lymph Nodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

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Transfer of neutralizing IgG to macaques 6 h but not 24 h after SHIV infection confers sterilizing protection : Implications for HIV-1 vaccine development. / Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Haigwood, Nancy; Sadjadpour, Reza; Donau, Olivia K.; Buckler, Charles; Plishka, Ron J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Martin, Malcolm A.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 100, No. 25, 09.12.2003, p. 15131-15136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nishimura, Yoshiaki ; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko ; Haigwood, Nancy ; Sadjadpour, Reza ; Donau, Olivia K. ; Buckler, Charles ; Plishka, Ron J. ; Buckler-White, Alicia ; Martin, Malcolm A. / Transfer of neutralizing IgG to macaques 6 h but not 24 h after SHIV infection confers sterilizing protection : Implications for HIV-1 vaccine development. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2003 ; Vol. 100, No. 25. pp. 15131-15136.
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