Transfer factor immunotherapy in human cancer

D. R. Burger, R. M. Vetto, Arthur Vandenbark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transfer factor immunotherapy is in an early stage of development, and there are necessarily a number of important variables in protocol. These include donor selection, activity assays for transfer factor, and the treatment regimen. Where tumor regression, clinical improvement and conversion of specific dermal reactivity occurred in the absence of other therapy, there seems little doubt that transfer factor had a significant effect. Where no improvement was observed, several possibilities deserve consideration: the donor may not have had effective antitumor immunity, the transfer factor may not have been active, the patient may have been immunologically refractive, or the tumor may have been directly or indirectly resistant to immune attack.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-95
Number of pages3
JournalSurgical Forum
VolumeVol. 25
StatePublished - 1974

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Transfer Factor
Immunotherapy
Neoplasms
Donor Selection
Immunity
Tissue Donors
Skin
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Burger, D. R., Vetto, R. M., & Vandenbark, A. (1974). Transfer factor immunotherapy in human cancer. Surgical Forum, Vol. 25, 93-95.

Transfer factor immunotherapy in human cancer. / Burger, D. R.; Vetto, R. M.; Vandenbark, Arthur.

In: Surgical Forum, Vol. Vol. 25, 1974, p. 93-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burger, DR, Vetto, RM & Vandenbark, A 1974, 'Transfer factor immunotherapy in human cancer', Surgical Forum, vol. Vol. 25, pp. 93-95.
Burger, D. R. ; Vetto, R. M. ; Vandenbark, Arthur. / Transfer factor immunotherapy in human cancer. In: Surgical Forum. 1974 ; Vol. Vol. 25. pp. 93-95.
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