Transballoon intravascular ultrasound imaging during balloon angioplasty in animal models with coarctation and branch pulmonary stenosis

John H. Stock, Mark Reller, Sanjeev Sharma, Dusan Pavcnik, Takahiro Shiota, David Sahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies performed after balloon dilation provide a method for evaluating the adequacy of angioplasty and the nature of associated changes in vessel walls. Previously, IVUS studies required the use of separate scanning catheters inserted independently before and after balloon angioplasty. We tested a 0.035-in, 30- MHz IVUS transducer wire that images from within commercially available 5F balloon dilation catheters. Methods and Results: Seven stenoses were created in the left pulmonary artery (n=3) and in the aortic isthmus (n=4) in six lambs (weight, 3,4 to 12.5 kg). The balloon catheter selected was advanced across the stenotic area and the IVUS wire advanced in the guide lumen to the center of the balloon. Continuous IVUS images were obtained through balloons before, during, and after dilation. Transballoon imaging confirmed balloon location within the stenotic segment. Luminal diameters of stenotic and adjacent vessel segments before and after angioplasty by IVUS showed good correlation with angiographic measurements (r=.93, P≤.001). After successful dilation, imaging during deflation allowed the assessment of vascular elastic recoil, mural dissection, and luminal size without requiring changes in balloon position. Repeat dilation could be undertaken and the inflation pressure and technique modified on the basis of the observed results. Conclusions: This transballoon IVUS system provides important on-line information about lumen diameter and wall structure for evaluation of angioplasty without the need for catheter changes, providing a method to possibly reduce the likelihood of excessive wall damage and to potentially reduce the number of angiograms required to accomplish and confirm results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2354-2357
Number of pages4
JournalCirculation
Volume95
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis
Balloon Angioplasty
Dilatation
Ultrasonography
Animal Models
Catheters
Angioplasty
Economic Inflation
Transducers
Pulmonary Artery
Blood Vessels
Dissection
Angiography
Pathologic Constriction
Pressure
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • angioplasty
  • coarctation
  • stenosis
  • ultrasonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Transballoon intravascular ultrasound imaging during balloon angioplasty in animal models with coarctation and branch pulmonary stenosis. / Stock, John H.; Reller, Mark; Sharma, Sanjeev; Pavcnik, Dusan; Shiota, Takahiro; Sahn, David.

In: Circulation, Vol. 95, No. 10, 1997, p. 2354-2357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stock, John H. ; Reller, Mark ; Sharma, Sanjeev ; Pavcnik, Dusan ; Shiota, Takahiro ; Sahn, David. / Transballoon intravascular ultrasound imaging during balloon angioplasty in animal models with coarctation and branch pulmonary stenosis. In: Circulation. 1997 ; Vol. 95, No. 10. pp. 2354-2357.
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