Trajectories and biopsychosocial predictors of daily acute pain in adolescents receiving treatment for pain: a daily diary study

Caroline Cummings, Sarah W.Feldstein Ewing, Denise D. Tran, Sydnee A. Stoyles, Nathan F. Dieckmann, Amy L. Holley, Anna C. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research regarding daily acute pain and its correlates has primarily been conducted with adolescents who have had major surgery or musculoskeletal pain, restraining efforts towards adapting interventions for adolescents with other sources of acute pain. We explored the trajectories and correlates of pain intensity. Adolescents with an opioid prescription to treat acute pain (N = 157) completed demographic questions, and the PROMIS pediatric depression and anxiety subscales. A 10-day daily diary assessed pain intensity, pain interference, sleep quality, and opioid use. Three trajectories of pain intensity emerged: (1) slow decreases in pain, (2) rapid decreases in pain, and (3) stable or slight increases in pain. Teens with stable pain demonstrated the greatest anxiety levels. Higher sleep quality predicted lower next day pain intensity and pain interference, when controlling for opioid use. Future research should employ intensive longitudinal methodology to further guide intervention development and prevent the transition to chronic pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute pain
  • Daily dairy
  • Pain interference
  • Sleep
  • Trajectories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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