Trading Vulnerabilities: Living with Parkinson's Disease before and after Deep Brain Stimulation

Sara Goering, Anna Wexler, Eran Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Implanted medical devices - for example, cardiac defibrillators, deep brain stimulators, and insulin pumps - offer users the possibility of regaining some control over an increasingly unruly body, the opportunity to become part cyborg in service of addressing pressing health needs. We recognize the value and effectiveness of such devices, but call attention to what may be less clear to potential users - that their vulnerabilities may not entirely disappear but instead shift. We explore the kinds of shifting vulnerabilities experienced by people with Parkinson's disease (PD) who receive therapeutic deep brain stimulators to help control their tremors and other symptoms of PD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-630
Number of pages8
JournalCambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2021

Keywords

  • Parkinson's disease
  • cyborg
  • deep brain stimulation
  • implanted medical devices
  • vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health Policy

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