Towards a Neurodevelopmental Model of Clinical Case Formulation

Marjorie Solomon, David Hessl, Sufen Chiu, Emily Olsen, Robert L. Hendren

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid advances in molecular genetics and neuroimaging over the last 10 to 20 years have been a catalyst for research in neurobiology, developmental psychopathology, and translational neuroscience. Methods of study in psychiatry, previously described as "slow maturing," now are becoming sufficiently sophisticated to more effectively investigate the biology of higher mental processes. Despite these technologic advances, the recognition that psychiatric disorders are disorders of neurodevelopment, and the importance of case formulation to clinical practice, a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation has not yet been articulated. The goals of this article, which is organized as a clinical case conference, are to begin to articulate a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation, to illustrate its value, and finally to explore how clinical psychiatric practice might evolve in the future if this model were employed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-211
Number of pages13
JournalPsychiatric Clinics of North America
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Mental Processes
Neurobiology
Neurosciences
Psychopathology
Neuroimaging
Molecular Biology
Research

Keywords

  • Case formulation
  • Endophenotypes
  • Fragile X Syndrome
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Pervasive developmental disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Towards a Neurodevelopmental Model of Clinical Case Formulation. / Solomon, Marjorie; Hessl, David; Chiu, Sufen; Olsen, Emily; Hendren, Robert L.

In: Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.03.2009, p. 199-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Solomon, Marjorie ; Hessl, David ; Chiu, Sufen ; Olsen, Emily ; Hendren, Robert L. / Towards a Neurodevelopmental Model of Clinical Case Formulation. In: Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 2009 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 199-211.
@article{8302f7c3090e4fbda5f85de78a3c659a,
title = "Towards a Neurodevelopmental Model of Clinical Case Formulation",
abstract = "Rapid advances in molecular genetics and neuroimaging over the last 10 to 20 years have been a catalyst for research in neurobiology, developmental psychopathology, and translational neuroscience. Methods of study in psychiatry, previously described as {"}slow maturing,{"} now are becoming sufficiently sophisticated to more effectively investigate the biology of higher mental processes. Despite these technologic advances, the recognition that psychiatric disorders are disorders of neurodevelopment, and the importance of case formulation to clinical practice, a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation has not yet been articulated. The goals of this article, which is organized as a clinical case conference, are to begin to articulate a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation, to illustrate its value, and finally to explore how clinical psychiatric practice might evolve in the future if this model were employed.",
keywords = "Case formulation, Endophenotypes, Fragile X Syndrome, Neurodevelopment, Pervasive developmental disorder",
author = "Marjorie Solomon and David Hessl and Sufen Chiu and Emily Olsen and Hendren, {Robert L.}",
year = "2009",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.psc.2008.11.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "199--211",
journal = "Psychiatric Clinics of North America",
issn = "0193-953X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Towards a Neurodevelopmental Model of Clinical Case Formulation

AU - Solomon, Marjorie

AU - Hessl, David

AU - Chiu, Sufen

AU - Olsen, Emily

AU - Hendren, Robert L.

PY - 2009/3/1

Y1 - 2009/3/1

N2 - Rapid advances in molecular genetics and neuroimaging over the last 10 to 20 years have been a catalyst for research in neurobiology, developmental psychopathology, and translational neuroscience. Methods of study in psychiatry, previously described as "slow maturing," now are becoming sufficiently sophisticated to more effectively investigate the biology of higher mental processes. Despite these technologic advances, the recognition that psychiatric disorders are disorders of neurodevelopment, and the importance of case formulation to clinical practice, a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation has not yet been articulated. The goals of this article, which is organized as a clinical case conference, are to begin to articulate a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation, to illustrate its value, and finally to explore how clinical psychiatric practice might evolve in the future if this model were employed.

AB - Rapid advances in molecular genetics and neuroimaging over the last 10 to 20 years have been a catalyst for research in neurobiology, developmental psychopathology, and translational neuroscience. Methods of study in psychiatry, previously described as "slow maturing," now are becoming sufficiently sophisticated to more effectively investigate the biology of higher mental processes. Despite these technologic advances, the recognition that psychiatric disorders are disorders of neurodevelopment, and the importance of case formulation to clinical practice, a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation has not yet been articulated. The goals of this article, which is organized as a clinical case conference, are to begin to articulate a neurodevelopmental model of case formulation, to illustrate its value, and finally to explore how clinical psychiatric practice might evolve in the future if this model were employed.

KW - Case formulation

KW - Endophenotypes

KW - Fragile X Syndrome

KW - Neurodevelopment

KW - Pervasive developmental disorder

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=60549106679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=60549106679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.psc.2008.11.003

DO - 10.1016/j.psc.2008.11.003

M3 - Review article

C2 - 19248925

AN - SCOPUS:60549106679

VL - 32

SP - 199

EP - 211

JO - Psychiatric Clinics of North America

JF - Psychiatric Clinics of North America

SN - 0193-953X

IS - 1

ER -