Top Ten Tips Palliative Care Clinicians Should Know about Medical Decision-Making Capacity Assessment

Sarah E. Ehrman, Kavitha P. Norton, David E. Karol, Meaghann S. Weaver, Bethany Lockwood, Abigail Latimer, Erin Scott, Christopher A. Jones, Robert Macauley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Palliative care (PC) clinicians treat seriously ill patients who are at increased risk for compromised decision-making capacity (DMC). These patients face profound and complex questions about which treatments to accept and which to decline. PC clinicians, therefore, have the especially difficult task of performing thorough, fair, and accurate DMC assessments in the face of the complex effects of terminal illness, which may be complicated by fluctuating acute medical conditions, mental illness, or cognitive dysfunction. This study, written by a team of clinicians with expertise in PC, ethics, psychiatry, pediatrics, and geriatrics, aims to provide expert guidance to PC clinicians on best practice for complex DMC assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-604
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of palliative medicine
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • capacity assessment
  • decision-making capacity
  • life-sustaining treatment
  • medical decision making
  • serious illness
  • surrogate decision maker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Top Ten Tips Palliative Care Clinicians Should Know about Medical Decision-Making Capacity Assessment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this