Toll-like receptors

novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neurological diseases

Brenda J. Marsh, Mary Stenzel-Poore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of evolutionarily conserved molecules that directly detect pathogen invasion or tissue damage and initiate a biological response. TLRs can signal through two primary intracellular pathways and as such can induce either immuno-stimulatory or immuno-modulatory molecules. Both sides of this twin-edged sword are being examined for their therapeutic potential in combating neurological disease. The immuno-stimulatory properties of TLRs are being used to generate tumor-specific immune responses to CNS tumors while the immuno-modulatory properties are being used to suppress damaging inflammatory responses to stroke. Recently, a third component of TLR signaling has begun to emerge-that of direct neuroprotection. Hence, the TLRs offer novel targets for the treatment of neurological disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-13
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pharmacology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Toll-Like Receptors
Pharmacology
Neoplasms
Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Toll-like receptors : novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. / Marsh, Brenda J.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary.

In: Current Opinion in Pharmacology, Vol. 8, No. 1, 02.2008, p. 8-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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