Tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other illegal drug use among young adults: The socioeconomic context

Bertrand Redonnet, Aude Chollet, Eric Fombonne, Lucy Bowes, Maria Melchior

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low socioeconomic position predicts risk of substance abuse, yet few studies tested the role of preexisting familial and individual characteristics. Methods: Data come from the TEMPO (Trajectoires Epidémiologiques en Population) study (community sample in France, 1991-2009, n=1103, 22-35 years in 2009) set up among offspring of participants of an epidemiological study (GAZEL). Past 12-month substance use was assessed in 2009 by self-completed mail survey: regular tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse (AUDIT), cannabis use, problematic cannabis use (CAST), other illegal drug use. Socioeconomic position was defined by educational attainment, occupational grade, employment stability and unemployment. Covariates included demographics (age, sex, relationship status, parenthood), family background (parental income, parental tobacco smoking, parental alcohol use), and juvenile characteristics (psychological problems, academic difficulties) measured longitudinally. Results: 35.8% of study participants were regular smokers, 14.3% abused alcohol, 22.6% used cannabis (6.3% had problematic cannabis use) and 4.1% used other illegal drugs. Except for alcohol abuse, substance use rates were systematically higher in individuals with low, rather than intermediate/high, socioeconomic position (age and sex-adjusted ORs from 1.75 for cannabis use to 2.11 for tobacco smoking and 2.44 for problematic cannabis use). In multivariate analyses these socioeconomic disparities were decreased, but remained statistically significant (except for illegal drugs other than cannabis). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking, alcohol, cannabis and polysubstance use are common behaviors among young adults, particularly those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage. Interventions aiming to decrease substance abuse and reduce socioeconomic inequalities in this area should be implemented early in life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-239
Number of pages9
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume121
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tobacco
Cannabis
Young Adult
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Smoking
Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders
Unemployment
Postal Service
France
Epidemiologic Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Parents
Demography
Psychology

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Cannabis
  • Epidemiology
  • Longitudinal cohort study
  • Socioeconomic position
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other illegal drug use among young adults : The socioeconomic context. / Redonnet, Bertrand; Chollet, Aude; Fombonne, Eric; Bowes, Lucy; Melchior, Maria.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 121, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 231-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Redonnet, Bertrand ; Chollet, Aude ; Fombonne, Eric ; Bowes, Lucy ; Melchior, Maria. / Tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other illegal drug use among young adults : The socioeconomic context. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2012 ; Vol. 121, No. 3. pp. 231-239.
@article{e2d9f184ac5c4f6380dad87aea99a808,
title = "Tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other illegal drug use among young adults: The socioeconomic context",
abstract = "Background: Low socioeconomic position predicts risk of substance abuse, yet few studies tested the role of preexisting familial and individual characteristics. Methods: Data come from the TEMPO (Trajectoires Epid{\'e}miologiques en Population) study (community sample in France, 1991-2009, n=1103, 22-35 years in 2009) set up among offspring of participants of an epidemiological study (GAZEL). Past 12-month substance use was assessed in 2009 by self-completed mail survey: regular tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse (AUDIT), cannabis use, problematic cannabis use (CAST), other illegal drug use. Socioeconomic position was defined by educational attainment, occupational grade, employment stability and unemployment. Covariates included demographics (age, sex, relationship status, parenthood), family background (parental income, parental tobacco smoking, parental alcohol use), and juvenile characteristics (psychological problems, academic difficulties) measured longitudinally. Results: 35.8{\%} of study participants were regular smokers, 14.3{\%} abused alcohol, 22.6{\%} used cannabis (6.3{\%} had problematic cannabis use) and 4.1{\%} used other illegal drugs. Except for alcohol abuse, substance use rates were systematically higher in individuals with low, rather than intermediate/high, socioeconomic position (age and sex-adjusted ORs from 1.75 for cannabis use to 2.11 for tobacco smoking and 2.44 for problematic cannabis use). In multivariate analyses these socioeconomic disparities were decreased, but remained statistically significant (except for illegal drugs other than cannabis). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking, alcohol, cannabis and polysubstance use are common behaviors among young adults, particularly those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage. Interventions aiming to decrease substance abuse and reduce socioeconomic inequalities in this area should be implemented early in life.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Cannabis, Epidemiology, Longitudinal cohort study, Socioeconomic position, Tobacco",
author = "Bertrand Redonnet and Aude Chollet and Eric Fombonne and Lucy Bowes and Maria Melchior",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.09.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "121",
pages = "231--239",
journal = "Drug and Alcohol Dependence",
issn = "0376-8716",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other illegal drug use among young adults

T2 - The socioeconomic context

AU - Redonnet, Bertrand

AU - Chollet, Aude

AU - Fombonne, Eric

AU - Bowes, Lucy

AU - Melchior, Maria

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - Background: Low socioeconomic position predicts risk of substance abuse, yet few studies tested the role of preexisting familial and individual characteristics. Methods: Data come from the TEMPO (Trajectoires Epidémiologiques en Population) study (community sample in France, 1991-2009, n=1103, 22-35 years in 2009) set up among offspring of participants of an epidemiological study (GAZEL). Past 12-month substance use was assessed in 2009 by self-completed mail survey: regular tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse (AUDIT), cannabis use, problematic cannabis use (CAST), other illegal drug use. Socioeconomic position was defined by educational attainment, occupational grade, employment stability and unemployment. Covariates included demographics (age, sex, relationship status, parenthood), family background (parental income, parental tobacco smoking, parental alcohol use), and juvenile characteristics (psychological problems, academic difficulties) measured longitudinally. Results: 35.8% of study participants were regular smokers, 14.3% abused alcohol, 22.6% used cannabis (6.3% had problematic cannabis use) and 4.1% used other illegal drugs. Except for alcohol abuse, substance use rates were systematically higher in individuals with low, rather than intermediate/high, socioeconomic position (age and sex-adjusted ORs from 1.75 for cannabis use to 2.11 for tobacco smoking and 2.44 for problematic cannabis use). In multivariate analyses these socioeconomic disparities were decreased, but remained statistically significant (except for illegal drugs other than cannabis). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking, alcohol, cannabis and polysubstance use are common behaviors among young adults, particularly those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage. Interventions aiming to decrease substance abuse and reduce socioeconomic inequalities in this area should be implemented early in life.

AB - Background: Low socioeconomic position predicts risk of substance abuse, yet few studies tested the role of preexisting familial and individual characteristics. Methods: Data come from the TEMPO (Trajectoires Epidémiologiques en Population) study (community sample in France, 1991-2009, n=1103, 22-35 years in 2009) set up among offspring of participants of an epidemiological study (GAZEL). Past 12-month substance use was assessed in 2009 by self-completed mail survey: regular tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse (AUDIT), cannabis use, problematic cannabis use (CAST), other illegal drug use. Socioeconomic position was defined by educational attainment, occupational grade, employment stability and unemployment. Covariates included demographics (age, sex, relationship status, parenthood), family background (parental income, parental tobacco smoking, parental alcohol use), and juvenile characteristics (psychological problems, academic difficulties) measured longitudinally. Results: 35.8% of study participants were regular smokers, 14.3% abused alcohol, 22.6% used cannabis (6.3% had problematic cannabis use) and 4.1% used other illegal drugs. Except for alcohol abuse, substance use rates were systematically higher in individuals with low, rather than intermediate/high, socioeconomic position (age and sex-adjusted ORs from 1.75 for cannabis use to 2.11 for tobacco smoking and 2.44 for problematic cannabis use). In multivariate analyses these socioeconomic disparities were decreased, but remained statistically significant (except for illegal drugs other than cannabis). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking, alcohol, cannabis and polysubstance use are common behaviors among young adults, particularly those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage. Interventions aiming to decrease substance abuse and reduce socioeconomic inequalities in this area should be implemented early in life.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Cannabis

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Longitudinal cohort study

KW - Socioeconomic position

KW - Tobacco

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857139915&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84857139915&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.09.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 21955362

AN - SCOPUS:84857139915

VL - 121

SP - 231

EP - 239

JO - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

JF - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

SN - 0376-8716

IS - 3

ER -