Title X Improved Access To Most Effective And Moderately Effective Contraception In US Safety-Net Clinics, 2016-18

Blair G. Darney, Frances M. Biel, Megan Hoopes, Maria I. Rodriguez, Brigit Hatch, Miguel Marino, Anna Templeton, Jee Oakley, Teresa Schmidt, Erika K. Cottrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Community health centers are a crucial source of health care for reproductive-age women. Some community health centers receive funding from the federal Title X program, which provides funding for family planning services for low-income women. We describe the provision of the most effective (intrauterine devices and implants) and moderately effective (short-acting hormonal methods) contraceptive methods in a large network of 384 community health center clinics across twenty states in 2016-18. Title X clinics provided more most and moderately effective contraception at all time points and for all age groups (adolescent, young adult, and adult). They provided 52 percent more of the most effective contraceptives to women at risk for pregnancy than clinics not funded by Title X. This finding was especially notable for adolescents (58 percent more). Title X clinics play a key role in access to effective contraception across the US safety net. Strengthening the Title X program should continue to be a policy priority for public health for the Biden-Harris administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-506
Number of pages10
JournalHealth affairs (Project Hope)
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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