Tissue-specific deletion and discontinuous loss of heterozygosity are signatures for the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation in solid tissues

Olga N. Ponomareva, Jennifer A. Rose, Michael Lasarev, Janet Rasey, Mitchell S. Turker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mouse Aprt locus on chromosome 8 was used as the selectable target for the study of spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced mutations in kidney epithelia and ear fibroblasts. Fifty-two Aprt heterozygous mice were exposed to 7.5 Gy of 137Cs-γ radiation on their right sides, and Aprt-deficient clones were isolated from enzymatically digested tissues at times ranging from 1 day to 14 months after irradiation. A statistically significant increase in the mutant frequencies for the irradiated tissues was observed when compared with the spontaneous mutant frequencies for the nonirradiated tissues. A molecular analysis of spontaneous mutations observed for the nonirradiated tissues revealed tissue-specific differences; apparent chromosome loss was common in kidney mutants but infrequent in the ear mutants, whereas apparent deletions were common in the ear mutants but not detected in the kidney mutants. For the irradiated kidneys, apparent deletions were observed commonly demonstrating that these events are markers for ionizing radiation mutagenesis in this tissue. All of the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) tracts observed in the spontaneous mutants were continuous, but discontinuous LOH patterns were observed in 6-8% of ionizing radiation-induced ear and kidney cell mutants. Work with kidney-derived cell lines showed that discontinuous LOH is a novel signature for delayed ionizing radiation mutagenesis. Considered together, these results suggest that ionizing radiation-induced mutations in vivo can result from both direct and delayed mutagenic effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1518-1523
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Research
Volume62
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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