Three-dose vs extended-course clindamycin prophylaxis for free-flap reconstruction of the head and neck

William R. Carroll, David Rosenstiel, Jobe R. Fix, Jorge De la Torre, Joel Solomon, Brian Brodish, Eben L. Rosenthal, Tad Heinz, Santosh Niwas, Glenn E. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Twenty-four hours of perioperative antibiotics provides effective prophylaxis for most head and neck cancer resections. Many reconstructive surgeons have been hesitant to apply this standard to free-flap reconstruction of the head and neck. This prospective clinical trial compared short-course and long-course clindamycin prophylaxis for wound infection in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing free-flap reconstruction. Methods: Seventy-four patients were randomized to receive short-course (3 doses) or long-course (15 doses) clindamycin perioperatively. Wound infections, fistulas, and other postoperative complications were documented by faculty surgeons who were blinded as to treatment group. Results: The differences in wound infections and other complications were statistically insignificant. No other independent predictors of wound complications emerged in this series of patients. Conclusions: Short-course clindamycin is as effective as long-course clindamycin in preventing wound infections after free-flap surgery for head and neck ablative defects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)771-774
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume129
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Clindamycin
Free Tissue Flaps
Wound Infection
Neck
Head
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Fistula
Clinical Trials
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Wounds and Injuries
Surgeons
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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Three-dose vs extended-course clindamycin prophylaxis for free-flap reconstruction of the head and neck. / Carroll, William R.; Rosenstiel, David; Fix, Jobe R.; De la Torre, Jorge; Solomon, Joel; Brodish, Brian; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Heinz, Tad; Niwas, Santosh; Peters, Glenn E.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 129, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 771-774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carroll, WR, Rosenstiel, D, Fix, JR, De la Torre, J, Solomon, J, Brodish, B, Rosenthal, EL, Heinz, T, Niwas, S & Peters, GE 2003, 'Three-dose vs extended-course clindamycin prophylaxis for free-flap reconstruction of the head and neck', Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 129, no. 7, pp. 771-774. https://doi.org/10.1001/archotol.129.7.771
Carroll, William R. ; Rosenstiel, David ; Fix, Jobe R. ; De la Torre, Jorge ; Solomon, Joel ; Brodish, Brian ; Rosenthal, Eben L. ; Heinz, Tad ; Niwas, Santosh ; Peters, Glenn E. / Three-dose vs extended-course clindamycin prophylaxis for free-flap reconstruction of the head and neck. In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 129, No. 7. pp. 771-774.
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AU - Rosenstiel, David

AU - Fix, Jobe R.

AU - De la Torre, Jorge

AU - Solomon, Joel

AU - Brodish, Brian

AU - Rosenthal, Eben L.

AU - Heinz, Tad

AU - Niwas, Santosh

AU - Peters, Glenn E.

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AB - Background: Twenty-four hours of perioperative antibiotics provides effective prophylaxis for most head and neck cancer resections. Many reconstructive surgeons have been hesitant to apply this standard to free-flap reconstruction of the head and neck. This prospective clinical trial compared short-course and long-course clindamycin prophylaxis for wound infection in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing free-flap reconstruction. Methods: Seventy-four patients were randomized to receive short-course (3 doses) or long-course (15 doses) clindamycin perioperatively. Wound infections, fistulas, and other postoperative complications were documented by faculty surgeons who were blinded as to treatment group. Results: The differences in wound infections and other complications were statistically insignificant. No other independent predictors of wound complications emerged in this series of patients. Conclusions: Short-course clindamycin is as effective as long-course clindamycin in preventing wound infections after free-flap surgery for head and neck ablative defects.

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