Therapy of patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-induced adult T-cell leukemia with anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody to the receptor for interleukin 2

T. A. Waldmann, C. K. Goldman, K. F. Bongiovanni, S. O. Sharrow, Michael Davey, K. B. Cease, S. J. Greenberg, D. L. Lango

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I)-induced adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells constitutively express interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptors identified by the anti-Tac monoclonal antibody (MoAb), whereas normal resting cells do not. This observation provided the scientific basis for a trial of intravenous anti-Tac in the treatment of nine patients with ATL. The patients did not suffer untoward reactions and did not have a reduction in the normal formed elements of the blood, and only one of the nine produced antibodies to the anti-Tac MoAb. Three patients had transient mixed, partial, or complete remissions lasting from 1 to more than 8 months after anti-Tac therapy, as assessed by routine hematologic tests, immunofluorescence analysis of circulating cells, and molecular genetic analysis of HTLV-I provirus integration and of the T-cell receptor gene rearrangement. The precise mechanism of the antitumor effects is unclear; however, the use of a MoAb that prevents the interaction of IL-2 with its receptor on ATL cells provides a rational approach for the treatment of this malignancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1805-1816
Number of pages12
JournalBlood
Volume72
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Adult T Cell Leukemia Lymphoma
T-cells
Interleukin-2 Receptors
Viruses
Monoclonal Antibodies
T-Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocyte Gene Rearrangement
Virus Integration
T-Cell Receptor Genes
Hematologic Tests
Therapeutics
Proviruses
Interleukin-2
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Molecular Biology
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Blood
Genes
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Waldmann, T. A., Goldman, C. K., Bongiovanni, K. F., Sharrow, S. O., Davey, M., Cease, K. B., ... Lango, D. L. (1988). Therapy of patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-induced adult T-cell leukemia with anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody to the receptor for interleukin 2. Blood, 72(5), 1805-1816.

Therapy of patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-induced adult T-cell leukemia with anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody to the receptor for interleukin 2. / Waldmann, T. A.; Goldman, C. K.; Bongiovanni, K. F.; Sharrow, S. O.; Davey, Michael; Cease, K. B.; Greenberg, S. J.; Lango, D. L.

In: Blood, Vol. 72, No. 5, 1988, p. 1805-1816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waldmann, TA, Goldman, CK, Bongiovanni, KF, Sharrow, SO, Davey, M, Cease, KB, Greenberg, SJ & Lango, DL 1988, 'Therapy of patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-induced adult T-cell leukemia with anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody to the receptor for interleukin 2', Blood, vol. 72, no. 5, pp. 1805-1816.
Waldmann, T. A. ; Goldman, C. K. ; Bongiovanni, K. F. ; Sharrow, S. O. ; Davey, Michael ; Cease, K. B. ; Greenberg, S. J. ; Lango, D. L. / Therapy of patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-induced adult T-cell leukemia with anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody to the receptor for interleukin 2. In: Blood. 1988 ; Vol. 72, No. 5. pp. 1805-1816.
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