The yeast pheromone response pathway: New insights into signal transmission

Betsy Ferguson, J. Horecka, J. Printen, J. Schultz, B. J. Stevenson, G. F. Sprague

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) pheromone response pathway is one of the best understood eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. Nonetheless, it is likely that components and regulators of the pathway remain to be identified. We have employed three approaches to learn about interactions among known pathway components and to identify new components. First, the two-hybrid system of Fields and Song revealed that STE5, a protein of unknown biochemical function, interacts with each member of the MAP kinase cascade. One interpretation of this finding is that STE5 facilitates interactions between members of the cascade and thereby makes signal transmission more efficient. Second, genetic studies have identified new gene functions that appear to be involved in pheromone response. One of these is homologous to RHO-GAP proteins, an observation that suggests that a RHO protein (members of the RAS super-family) is part of the response pathway. A second gene function, FAR3, appears to be required only for a specific facet of pheromone response, arrest of the mitotic cell division cycle in G1.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)223-228
    Number of pages6
    JournalCellular and Molecular Biology Research
    Volume40
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    Pheromones
    Yeast
    Yeasts
    Genes
    GTPase-Activating Proteins
    Signal transduction
    MAP Kinase Signaling System
    Music
    Hybrid systems
    Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Signal Transduction
    Cell Cycle
    Proteins
    Phosphotransferases
    Cells
    Observation

    Keywords

    • Cell cycle control
    • MAP kinase cascade
    • Protein-protein interactions
    • RHO-GAP homologue
    • Two-hybrid system

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cell Biology
    • Clinical Biochemistry
    • Molecular Biology

    Cite this

    Ferguson, B., Horecka, J., Printen, J., Schultz, J., Stevenson, B. J., & Sprague, G. F. (1994). The yeast pheromone response pathway: New insights into signal transmission. Cellular and Molecular Biology Research, 40(3), 223-228.

    The yeast pheromone response pathway : New insights into signal transmission. / Ferguson, Betsy; Horecka, J.; Printen, J.; Schultz, J.; Stevenson, B. J.; Sprague, G. F.

    In: Cellular and Molecular Biology Research, Vol. 40, No. 3, 1994, p. 223-228.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ferguson, B, Horecka, J, Printen, J, Schultz, J, Stevenson, BJ & Sprague, GF 1994, 'The yeast pheromone response pathway: New insights into signal transmission', Cellular and Molecular Biology Research, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 223-228.
    Ferguson B, Horecka J, Printen J, Schultz J, Stevenson BJ, Sprague GF. The yeast pheromone response pathway: New insights into signal transmission. Cellular and Molecular Biology Research. 1994;40(3):223-228.
    Ferguson, Betsy ; Horecka, J. ; Printen, J. ; Schultz, J. ; Stevenson, B. J. ; Sprague, G. F. / The yeast pheromone response pathway : New insights into signal transmission. In: Cellular and Molecular Biology Research. 1994 ; Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 223-228.
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