The value of patch testing patients with a scattered generalized distribution of dermatitis

Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2004

Kathryn A. Zug, Robert L. Rietschel, Erin M. Warshaw, Donald V. Belsito, James S. Taylor, Howard I. Maibach, C. G Toby Mathias, Joseph F. Fowler, James G. Marks, Vincent A. DeLeo, Melanie D. Pratt, Denis Sasseville, Frances Storrs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A scattered generalized distribution (SGD) of dermatitis is a challenging problem; patch testing is a strategy for evaluating allergic contact dermatitis as a relevant factor. Objective: We sought to analyze patient characteristics and most frequently relevant positive allergens in patients presenting for patch testing with SGD. Methods: We conducted retrospective cross-sectional analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group 2001 to 2004 data. Patients with SGD were compared with patients without SGD. Results: Of 10,061 patients, 14.9% (n = 1497) had only a SGD. Men and patients with a history of atopic eczema were more likely to have dermatitis in a SGD (P <.001). Preservatives, fragrances, propylene glycol, cocamidopropyl betaine, ethyleneurea melamine formaldehyde, tixocortol pivalate, and budesonide were among the more frequently relevant positive allergens. Top allergen sources included cosmetics/beauty preparations/skin and health care products, clothing, and topical corticoids. Limitations: This was a retrospective analysis of patch-tested patients with SGD suspected to have allergy. Conclusions: A total of 49% of patients with SGD had at least one relevant positive allergen, thus demonstrating the benefit of patch testing these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-431
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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Contact Dermatitis
Dermatitis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Allergens
Skin Care
Beauty
Budesonide
Propylene Glycol
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Clothing
Atopic Dermatitis
Cosmetics
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Hypersensitivity
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

The value of patch testing patients with a scattered generalized distribution of dermatitis : Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2004. / Zug, Kathryn A.; Rietschel, Robert L.; Warshaw, Erin M.; Belsito, Donald V.; Taylor, James S.; Maibach, Howard I.; Mathias, C. G Toby; Fowler, Joseph F.; Marks, James G.; DeLeo, Vincent A.; Pratt, Melanie D.; Sasseville, Denis; Storrs, Frances.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 59, No. 3, 09.2008, p. 426-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zug, Kathryn A. ; Rietschel, Robert L. ; Warshaw, Erin M. ; Belsito, Donald V. ; Taylor, James S. ; Maibach, Howard I. ; Mathias, C. G Toby ; Fowler, Joseph F. ; Marks, James G. ; DeLeo, Vincent A. ; Pratt, Melanie D. ; Sasseville, Denis ; Storrs, Frances. / The value of patch testing patients with a scattered generalized distribution of dermatitis : Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2004. In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2008 ; Vol. 59, No. 3. pp. 426-431.
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