The use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures

Jin Sik Burm, Juliana Hansen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The use of microplates in mandible fractures is not widely accepted, although microplate systems are commonly used for treatment of maxillofacial fractures. This study evaluated the use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures with no comminution or bony defects. Methods: Thirty-five patients with mandibular fractures (26 double and nine single) were treated. Of the 61 fractures, 54 were stabilized using 0.55-mm-thick microplates and 1.2-mm monocortical microscrews. The fractures were exposed through either an intraoral or a percutaneous approach. In general, two-point fixation with two microplates or one microplate and wires was performed. Interdental wiring was added for symphyseal or body fractures to confer further stability onto the dental arch. No intermaxillary fixation was used. Results: During a follow-up period ranging from 3 to 29 months, all fractures showed complete bone healing. There were eight complications in seven patients with a double fracture, including mild malocclusion (n = 3), paresthesia (n = 3), asymptomatic delayed union (n = 1), and asymptomatic plate fracture (n = 1). No further orthodontic or surgical treatment was performed as a result of these complications. No other complications requiring further treatment occurred. There were three residual complications of mild malocclusion, paresthesia, and asymptomatic plate fracture at final follow-up. Conclusions: These results indicate that two-point fixation with microplates is appropriate for the internal fixation of simple, isolated mandibular fractures. Its advantages include a high adaptability to the fracture site, occlusal self-adjustment, a minimal mass effect, and a relatively strong holding power of two-point fixation.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1485-1492
    Number of pages8
    JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Volume125
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 2010

    Fingerprint

    Mandibular Fractures
    Malocclusion
    Paresthesia
    Occlusal Adjustment
    Dental Arch
    Orthodontics
    Mandible
    Therapeutics
    Bone and Bones

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    The use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures. / Burm, Jin Sik; Hansen, Juliana.

    In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 125, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 1485-1492.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{f5f4846f1bd44d0292781761b6622e0e,
    title = "The use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures",
    abstract = "Background: The use of microplates in mandible fractures is not widely accepted, although microplate systems are commonly used for treatment of maxillofacial fractures. This study evaluated the use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures with no comminution or bony defects. Methods: Thirty-five patients with mandibular fractures (26 double and nine single) were treated. Of the 61 fractures, 54 were stabilized using 0.55-mm-thick microplates and 1.2-mm monocortical microscrews. The fractures were exposed through either an intraoral or a percutaneous approach. In general, two-point fixation with two microplates or one microplate and wires was performed. Interdental wiring was added for symphyseal or body fractures to confer further stability onto the dental arch. No intermaxillary fixation was used. Results: During a follow-up period ranging from 3 to 29 months, all fractures showed complete bone healing. There were eight complications in seven patients with a double fracture, including mild malocclusion (n = 3), paresthesia (n = 3), asymptomatic delayed union (n = 1), and asymptomatic plate fracture (n = 1). No further orthodontic or surgical treatment was performed as a result of these complications. No other complications requiring further treatment occurred. There were three residual complications of mild malocclusion, paresthesia, and asymptomatic plate fracture at final follow-up. Conclusions: These results indicate that two-point fixation with microplates is appropriate for the internal fixation of simple, isolated mandibular fractures. Its advantages include a high adaptability to the fracture site, occlusal self-adjustment, a minimal mass effect, and a relatively strong holding power of two-point fixation.",
    author = "Burm, {Jin Sik} and Juliana Hansen",
    year = "2010",
    month = "5",
    doi = "10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181d51244",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "125",
    pages = "1485--1492",
    journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
    issn = "0032-1052",
    publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
    number = "5",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures

    AU - Burm, Jin Sik

    AU - Hansen, Juliana

    PY - 2010/5

    Y1 - 2010/5

    N2 - Background: The use of microplates in mandible fractures is not widely accepted, although microplate systems are commonly used for treatment of maxillofacial fractures. This study evaluated the use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures with no comminution or bony defects. Methods: Thirty-five patients with mandibular fractures (26 double and nine single) were treated. Of the 61 fractures, 54 were stabilized using 0.55-mm-thick microplates and 1.2-mm monocortical microscrews. The fractures were exposed through either an intraoral or a percutaneous approach. In general, two-point fixation with two microplates or one microplate and wires was performed. Interdental wiring was added for symphyseal or body fractures to confer further stability onto the dental arch. No intermaxillary fixation was used. Results: During a follow-up period ranging from 3 to 29 months, all fractures showed complete bone healing. There were eight complications in seven patients with a double fracture, including mild malocclusion (n = 3), paresthesia (n = 3), asymptomatic delayed union (n = 1), and asymptomatic plate fracture (n = 1). No further orthodontic or surgical treatment was performed as a result of these complications. No other complications requiring further treatment occurred. There were three residual complications of mild malocclusion, paresthesia, and asymptomatic plate fracture at final follow-up. Conclusions: These results indicate that two-point fixation with microplates is appropriate for the internal fixation of simple, isolated mandibular fractures. Its advantages include a high adaptability to the fracture site, occlusal self-adjustment, a minimal mass effect, and a relatively strong holding power of two-point fixation.

    AB - Background: The use of microplates in mandible fractures is not widely accepted, although microplate systems are commonly used for treatment of maxillofacial fractures. This study evaluated the use of microplates for internal fixation of mandibular fractures with no comminution or bony defects. Methods: Thirty-five patients with mandibular fractures (26 double and nine single) were treated. Of the 61 fractures, 54 were stabilized using 0.55-mm-thick microplates and 1.2-mm monocortical microscrews. The fractures were exposed through either an intraoral or a percutaneous approach. In general, two-point fixation with two microplates or one microplate and wires was performed. Interdental wiring was added for symphyseal or body fractures to confer further stability onto the dental arch. No intermaxillary fixation was used. Results: During a follow-up period ranging from 3 to 29 months, all fractures showed complete bone healing. There were eight complications in seven patients with a double fracture, including mild malocclusion (n = 3), paresthesia (n = 3), asymptomatic delayed union (n = 1), and asymptomatic plate fracture (n = 1). No further orthodontic or surgical treatment was performed as a result of these complications. No other complications requiring further treatment occurred. There were three residual complications of mild malocclusion, paresthesia, and asymptomatic plate fracture at final follow-up. Conclusions: These results indicate that two-point fixation with microplates is appropriate for the internal fixation of simple, isolated mandibular fractures. Its advantages include a high adaptability to the fracture site, occlusal self-adjustment, a minimal mass effect, and a relatively strong holding power of two-point fixation.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951868826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951868826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181d51244

    DO - 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181d51244

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 20440166

    AN - SCOPUS:77951868826

    VL - 125

    SP - 1485

    EP - 1492

    JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    SN - 0032-1052

    IS - 5

    ER -